Fermanagh Junior Football 1942.

FERMANAGH JUNIOR LEAGUE. MULLEEK’S WIN OVER CASHEL. Mulleek 6-2. Cashel 0-3. There was a good attendance at Cashel Gaelic Park on Sunday, when Cashel and Mulleek teams met in the Junior League competition. Mulleek started with a slight breeze in their favour. From the throw-in they broke away bombarding the Cashel goals, but Leonard  (the goalie) did some splendid saving. For the first ten minutes Cashel defence held good. A determined rush by Mulleek forwards resulted in a goal per H. McGauran. Despite some fine Cashel clearances, Mulleek had another major per H. McGauran. Inside of a few minutes Pat McGauran again raised the red flag for the visitors. At this stage play waxed very rough, and one of the Cashel, players had to retire owing to severe head injuries. Fisticuffs were indulged in and it was only by exercising great tact that the referee settled the fracas. In the last five minutes of this moiety Mulleek added two goals per H. McGauran and P. McCaffrey and 2 points per P. McCaffrey arid Sean McCaffrey. Half-time score Mulleek, 5 goals 2 pts.; Cashel, nil. No sooner had the game resumed than Cashel went to the attack but the Mulleek defence was impregnable. Play veered from one side to the other, and several Mulleek shots went wide. A determined Cashel rush resulted in 3 points scored in quick succession by Frank Gallagher, Alfie McGovern and P. McGee. Frayed tempers resulted in further incidents. Mulleek had the last score of the match— a goal per Sean McCaffery. Cashel had much, lighter team than Mulleek, who also showed superior training in catching and combination. Mr, J. Daly, Belleek, refereed.

DEVENISH V. DRUMAVANTY. Before a large attendance of spectators the above teams met at Drumavanty on, Sunday. The game which was one of the closest and best contests ever witnessed at Drumavanty was an exhibition of good football of high standard played in a sporting manner and spectators were kept at a pitch of excitement with not a dull, moment from the throw-in to the final whistle. The final scores were:—Drumavanty, 0 goals 6 points; Devenish, 1 goal 2 pts. Rev. Brother Gilleece, Ballyshannon, was a very efficient referee.

As a prelude to the junior game a minor match was played between Ballyshannon and Devenish, which proved very interesting. In this game Ballyshannon, who were faster and better trained than their rivals, emerged victorious by the score of 3 goals 2 points for Ballyshannon; 1 goal 3 points for Devenish. Rev. J. Burns, C.C., refereed.

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1942 June.

£550 SOUGHT FOR MOUNTAIN BURNING. Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, referred to its solicitor a preliminary notice of application for compensation on behalf of the Earl of Enniskillen for £550 for the burning of 1,500 acres of mountain lands with the heather, grass, game and game cover on the lands of Aghatirourke.

CARETAKER’S APPLICATION. Application for an increase in salary was made by Mr. James H. Kerr, cemetery caretaker, to the Enniskillen Rural District Council on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., presiding. Mr. Kerr said he had been nineteen years in the Council’s service and had only received one small increase in salary, six years ago. He had not taken any holidays since his appointment. The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) said Mr. Kerr’s salary was £63 a year (inclusive of £13 bonus) with free house, coal and light, and 3/- for each grave. The Ministry would not, in his (the clerk’s) opinion grant an increase of salary in accordance with wartime regulations. It was decided to consider the application at the next meeting in July.

20-6-1942. SCOTSTOWN POTEEN CHARGE. At Monaghan District Court., before Mr. P. Lavery, D.J. at the suit of Supt. Ryan, Bernard McElmeel, Glan, Scotstown, was fined £6 for having a half-pint of illicit spirits, in his possession, Guard Hegarty stating that defendant, who was without a light on a bicycle, accelerated his speed when he met witness, who subsequently found a bottle containing poteen on the road. Defendant denied it was his. Mr. McWilliams, solr., for McElmeel, admitted ownership, and said his client lived with his father, aged 74 and there was no one else to look after the crop.

20-6-1942. £5 10s WEEKLY FOR MAN, HORSE, CART. COUNCIL OBJECTIONS. Horses and carts are almost unobtainable for daily hire in the Enniskillen district, being regularly employed on constant work, Mr, J. Donnelly, Surveyor, had reported to the Town improvement Committee: “Owing to the almost continuous employment of the Council’s lorry on the collection of waste paper and scrap iron, he found it necessary to hire a horse with cart and harness for street maintenance and other works. The horse, cart and harness was supplied by Mr. H. Sadlier, carting contractor to the Council. The driver was supplied by the Council.”

The committee recommended that Mr. Sadlier be paid a rate of 10/- per day. Mr. T. Algeo, after the reading of the foregoing report asked what was the rate of pay of the man regularly employed with, horse and cart by the Council. Mr. Donnelly said £3 10s weekly. Mr. Algeo said this thing should have been advertised, and they would have got a lot of people to do it more cheaply. One man was getting £3 10s for himself, his horse and cart; while for another they were, paying £5 10s for the horse and cart and man. Mr. Donnelly said the rate was fixed by the committee. The work had been increasing to such an extent that the lorry could no longer do it. Previously he had employed Francis Cleary at 15/- daily, but he had refused to do it this time at less than 25/- daily, at which, rate he said he was, paid elsewhere. He (Mr. Donnelly) tried everywhere to get another horse and cart, but could not do so. Mr Sadlier bought, a horse to provide it with a cart for the Council. The rate was 19/- weekly approximately. Mr. G. Elliott said there was no hope of getting it done cheaper. The matter was approved, Mr, Algeo dissenting.

20-6-1942. CAVAN FARMERS HIT BY SHORTAGE OF LABOUR. The shortage of labour on Cavan farms was referred to by members at a meeting of Cavan Agricultural Committee. Mr. Dolan said that farmers worked 16 hours a day tilling the land and they could not get the crop in. The secretary thought it would be doubly difficult getting it out. Mr. Taite — A lot of young people are going away to better themselves and it is hard to blame them. Senator Baxter said the number of men on the land was not sufficient to save the harvest. It was suggested that shopkeepers in towns should close for a few days weekly and allow off the assistants—-mostly farmers’ sons—to help on the land.

The secretary said voluntary organisation of some kind was needed. Senator Baxter suggested that if the urban dwellers realised the. grave risk to the, harvest they would willingly cooperate. At a meeting of Co. Monaghan Agricultural Committee reference was made to the glut of potatoes. Mr. McGahey said anything would be better than to see the potatoes rotting in the pits. Mr. Pollock said with the present glut it might be possible under a trade pact with Britain to exchange the potatoes for coal. Mr. McEntee said a stone of oatmeal could not be got in Monaghan.

20-6-1942. RHUBARB WANTED. ANY QUANTITY. HIGHEST PRICES PAID —AT- GRACEY’S The BROOK, ENNISKILLEN.

20-6-1942. ACCIDENT TO ENNISKILLEN STEAM ROLLER. The steam roller of Enniskillen Urban Council, while working (on hire) at an avenue in Lord Enniskillen’s demesne, Florencecourt, sunk on the side of the avenue and partly overturned. It took three, days’ efforts to get it out again. The roller was thus out of commission from 26th May till 2nd June. It had been on hire for three weeks at the time of the accident. Since then a number of badly worn tubes had to be replaced, Mr. Donnelly, Surveyor, told Enniskillen U.D.C.

20-6-1942. YOUNGSTERS BEGGING FROM U.S. TROOPS. REFERENCE AT URBAN COUNCIL. Mr. W. E. Johnston drew attention to the conduct of youngsters in Enniskillen begging from American soldiers. “It is an absolute disgrace the way the children are running, after these soldiers, stopping them, and begging at every corner,” he said. These soldiers were very kind, and when they came gave money to these kiddies, and now the soldiers were being absolutely annoyed. . Something should be done. This habit was not confined to Enniskillen, for he read of it happening elsewhere—in Belfast, Bangor, etc. It was not good to see this going on. It did not show Enniskillen up very well. It was decided to draw the attention of the police to the matter.

13-6-1942. NEW CAVAN CATHEDRAL FORMALLY OPENED BY BISHOP OF KILMORE. HIS LORDSHIP RECALLS THE DAYS OF PERSECUTION. The new Cathedral in Cavan was, on Sunday, formally opened for public worship by Most Rev. Dr. Lyons, Bishop of Kilmore. Three hundred years ago, Bishop Hugh O’Reilly, of Kilmore, suffered insult and. imprisonment for his faith. It was he who originated the Catholic Confederacy and fought against bitterness, treachery, and the persecution of his flock. It was fitting that his successor should use his chalice in the celebration of the first public Mass in the new edifice. “A symbol of victory” was the description applied by Most Rev. Dr. Lyons to his beautiful Cathedral, when, he addressed the vast congregation at the opening ceremony.

The building of a cathedral at any time” he said, “is proof of a vigorous religious life in a diocese. This Cathedral is much more it is the sign of our religious resurgence. “It links us across three centuries with the days of the great Hugh O’Reilly, Bishop of Kilmore, whose Chalice, well over 300 years old, is in use in the holy Mass to-day.’ “This Cathedral of Saints Patrick and Felim is an eloquent and noble act of thanksgiving to the Omnipotent God, who, over centuries has with, the outstretched arm of His Providence preserved our people in their ancient faith.”

BUILDING OF CATHEDRAL. Under the untiring zeal and efforts of Most Rev. Dr. Lyons, the splendid Cathedral has been almost completed in three years. The building fund was inaugurated in 1919 by the late Most Rev. Dr. Finnegan., and the foundation stone was laid in September, 1939. Next September the dedication ceremony will take place, marking the completion of the work. The Cathedral stands beside the old one, which will be taken down, stone by stone, to be re-erected in Ballyhaise, thus preserving a link with the glorious past of this historic diocese.

20-6-1942. JOTTINGS. Warships Collection.—Total to date in Fermanagh is £310,620, of which Enniskillen contributed £106,153, Irvinestown £46,534, and Lisnaskea £43,757.

Prisoner of War—included in the latest list of British prisoners of war in Italian hands is Pte. James Steward Bercin, Letter P.O. Fermanagh.

Monaghan postmaster for Mullingar—Mr. John Cassin, postmaster, Monaghan, has been transferred on promotion to be postmaster of Mullingar.

Monea Man’s Death—Word has been received that Pte. Edward Scott, son of Mr. Robert Scott, Means, Monea, County Fermanagh, has died in a prisoner of war camp in Italy.

W.V.S. Savings Effort. — W.V.S. Savings Groups for Fermanagh Warship Week provided the following totals: Enniskillen, £2,892 2s 8d; Enniskillen Rural, £7.753 14s Id; Lisnaskea Rural, £8,250 4s 6d.

A. F. Man missing—Flight-Sergeant Ronnie West, son of Mr. and Mrs. John West, Trory, Ballinamallard, Co. Fermanagh, has been reported missing following one of the bomber raids on Germany.

Kilskeery Aeridheacht.—The winner of the. solo singing (Anglo-Irish, under 14) at Kilskeery aeridheacht recently was Miss Nuala Drumm, Convent of Mercy, Enniskillen, not Nuala Quinn, as already stated.

Food and Drugs officers—Fermanagh County Council on Friday appointed Sergeant William O’Donnell, Belcoo, to be Food and Drugs Inspector for the Letterbreen Petty Sessions district, and Sergeant J. D. Cochrane for the Belleek Petty Sessions district.

Sympathy-Fermanagh Co., Council on Friday, on the proposal of Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., seconded by Mr. J. W. Creighton, J.P., passed a resolution of sympathy with Mr. H. A. Burke, LL.B., Under-Sheriff, on the death of his father, Mr. H. A. Burke, D.L.

Fermanagh County council Officers—Sir Basil Brooke, M.P., was on Friday re-elected chairman of Fermanagh County Council, at the annual meeting pf that body. The re-election of the chairman was passed unanimously on the motion of Mr. A. Wilson, seconded by Mr. T. M. Noble. Hon. Cecil Lowry-Corry, J.P., was unanimously re-elected vice-chairman on the motion of Mr. G. Elliott, seconded by Mr. J. W. Creighton, J.P.

Rat Instead of Fish. While fishing for pike in the River Finn, near Rosslea, Mr. Joseph Montgomery, principal teacher, Rosslea P.E. School, had a remarkable experience. Mr. Montgomery was using a minnow and having felt a tug on his line, he proceeded to haul it in. To his amazement he landed, not a fish, but a large rat which was firmly hooked on the minnow.

20-6-1942. SONS OF ENNISKILLEN MAN GET DISTINCTIONS IN BRITISH COLONIAL SERVICE. Six sons, all of whom occupy or have retired from positions in the Colonial service—this is the record of the family of Mr. C. Bartley, retired inspector of schools. Fairview, Enniskillen, a native of County Monaghan whose eldest son, Charles, has just retired from a Judgeship of the High Court, Calcutta, and has been awarded a Knighthood. Sir Charles Bartley’s eldest son, recently awarded the. D.F.C. is now a squadron leader in the R.A.F.

Mr. Bartley’s other five sons are William, recently retired from the Colonial Civil Service, and who has just been awarded Companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. George (C.M.G.) and Member of the Order of the British. Empire (M.B.E.). John, who is additional Secretary to the Government of India and who has been awarded Companion of the Order of the Star of India (C.S.I.) and Companion of the Order of the Indian Empire (C.I.E.); Frederick, who has retired from the Indian Police, and who was awarded Commander of the Order of the British. Empire (C.B.E.) and also the King’s Police Medal with Bar; Douglas, who is Judge of the Supreme Court in Kenya and Gwyther, who is Deputy Inspector General of the police force in Assam, and who has been awarded the King’s Police Medal. Sir Charles and Jack are scholars of Trinity College both being senior moderators in classics and modern literature.

20-6-1942. ENNISKILLEN WOMAN FINED. Unlawful possession of army property was alleged against Mrs. Sidney Thompson, 5, Mary St., Enniskillen, who, at the local Petty Sessions on Monday, was charged with haying ten blankets, two paillasses and one pillow-slip, the property of the Army Council.

D.I. Peacocke prosecuted, and said defendant was the wife of a serving soldier. He alleged, she made a statement saving that eight of the blankets were the property of her husband’s grandmother, and the other two she bought in Brookeboro’. She added that her husband brought the other articles to the house. Head Constable Thornton gave evidence of searching defendant’s house and finding the property.. She made the statement read by the D.I. Sergeant Bailey, of the Special Investigation Branch of the Corps of Military Police, testified to accompanying the last witness when the search was made. All the blankets (produced) were W.D. property, and he was satisfied four of them were manufactured certainly not before 1940. One of the others might have been rejected by the Army. Ink stains on it made it appear as if it had been used on an office table and it was quite possible defendant’s husband might have come by it lawfully.

Miss A, Barrett, shopkeeper, Brookeborough, who had sold discarded Army blankets in her shop, did not think any of the blankets shown her had ever passed through her shop, and she did not recollect ever selling the defendant any. Asked by Major Dickie, P.M., if she wished to give evidence, defendant replied in the negative. His Worship said he must hold the charge proved. He observed that if the blankets had been new he would have taken a serious view of the case. He fined defendant 40/- and 6/8 costs, ordering that the property be returned to the military authorities.

20-6-1942. FOUR MONTHS JAIL SENTENCE ON NEWTOWNBUTLER MAN. Second Fined £50. R.M.—”DELIBERATE SMUGGLING” “I am tired giving those warnings and nobody seems to bother about them,” declared Major; Dickie, R.M., when recalling that, at previous Courts he had announced that stiff terms of imprisonment were in store for those caught smuggling. He was speaking at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, when Philip Swift of Lisnashillinda, was summoned for being knowingly concerned in removing 12 stone of flour and 14 cwt. sulphate of ammonia with intent to evade the prohibition of export. James Johnston, Kiltober was summonsed for being knowingly concerned in harbouring 14 cwts. sulphate of ammonia, 1 cwt 2 qrs. flour, 1 qr. custard powder, 14 lbs. pepper, 48 parcels of Bisto and 4 lbs. toilet soap, with intent to evade the prohibition. Mr. J. P. Black, solr., tendered a plea of guilty on behalf of Swift.

In the ease against Johnston, Sergeant Green said that on Sunday, 3th February he saw Swift outside a cafe in Newtownbutler. Later three military trucks drew up and Swift followed the soldiers inside. Later Swift left the town on his bicycle and one of the trucks followed him. The police followed both and discovered the truck at Johnston’s house, just on the border. They also saw Swift running away. In the byre they found the sulphate of ammonia and flour and the other articles (listed in the summons), in the dwelling house. They also seized four gross of clothes pegs for which Johnston was separately summonsed. Johnston told witness he got the pegs in Cavan.

Cross-examined by Mr. J. B. Murphy, witness said he was satisfied Johnston was not present when the stuff was delivered and it had been removed by the police before he reached home again. Constable Duffy also gave evidence. Robert Clarke, a serving soldier, grave evidence that Swift requested him, as a favour to deliver some sacks and witness agreed. They left the bags at a farm on the Clones road; seven bags of sulphate of ammonia and two bags of flour. Johnston, in evidence, said he had been away after Mass on Sunday morning till 3 a.m. on Monday, seeing an uncle at Smithboro’ and knew nothing about the transaction till he was informed by the servant girl. Cross-examined by Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, defendant admitted Swift had spoken to him on the previous Friday about the proposed smuggling, but he Johnston, declined to have anything to do with it.

Mr, Murphy submitted that there was no evidence to show Johnston knew anything about the smuggling on that particular date. His Worship said defendant lived on the border and all the commodities in question had been found in this premises and yet Mr. Murphy was suggesting, there was no evidence against him. Anybody with intelligence should see that he was bringing the stuff to Johnston’s house had no sympathy with him. Mr. Black said his client admitted bringing the stuff to Johnston’s house but that Johnston did not know anything about it. His Worship said he had often stated

27-6-1942. CYCLIST’S FATAL INJURIES. KILLADEAS WOMANS FATE. Miss Catherine Breen, Drogan, Killadeas (73), single, who was seriously injured when as she was cycling near Riversdale, Ballinamallard, she was in collision with a private motor car, died in Fermanagh County Hospital on Monday evening. At an inquest in Fermanagh County Hospital an Tuesday, by Coroner George Warren and a jury, a verdict was returned of accidental death, no blame being attached to the driver. The driver, Ernest Stewart, cinema manager Lisnarick Rd., Irvinestown, driver of the car, stated he was driving from Enniskillen to Irvinestown, about 4 p.m. on Sunday at 30 mph. As he approached Riversdale Avenue he blew his horn. The cyclist came out of the Avenue straight in front of the car. He swerved to the right to avoid her but she went in front of the car and the left front headlamp hit her. He did everything in his power to avoid the collision.

Charles G. Thompson, V.S., Strabane, who was sitting beside the driver of the car, Thomas Aiken, Irvinestown, and Henry Crowhurst, Henry St., Enniskillen who were in the back of the car, gave similar evidence, stating the cyclist came out so quickly she could not be avoided. Evidence of identification was given by W. J. Breen, deceased’s brother, and Constable Bothwell produced a sketch, of the road and gave measurements.

27-6-1942. MARRIED TEACHERS NOT TO RESIGN. Fermanagh Education Committee heard from the Secretary (Mr, J. J. Maguire) that the junior assistant mistress appointed to Clonelly School at the last meeting had not taken the position. He wondered if the Committee would rescind the resolution on the books providing that a female teacher must resign three months after marriage. It was very difficult to get teachers. Capt. Wray —I see they are doing that in England. Secretary — It is an emergency provision for the duration of the war only. Dean MacManaway intimated he would hand in notice to have the resolution rescinded.

27-6-1942. YOUNG AMERICAN STUDENT’S SUCCESS. GRANDSON OF ENNISKILLEN MAN. The New York papers recently carried the news of the success of Mr. Joseph J. Martin in the annual elocution contest among students, of Fordham Preparatory School, high school division of Fordham University. Master Martin is a son of the Hon. Joseph P. Martin, assistant United States District Attorney, and grandson of Mr. Joseph Martin, Derrychara, Enniskillen (a native of Derrylin), retired official of the U.S. Postal Department. An uncle of the successful student is Mr. Jack Martin, B.A., N.T., Virginia, Co. Cavan. Master Martin is the holder of many awards as an orator, elocutionist, debater and thespian and he received a gold medal for his rendition of “The Burgomaster’s Death.” Assistant District Attorney Joe Martin is now attached to the United States armed forces.

27-6-1942. MEN WHO KEEP SONS AT HOME. Disabled Ex-Soldier’s Daughter’s Relief Claim. The daughter of a now disabled soldier who fought in the Great War and the South African War was refused outdoor relief by Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday.

The girl, aged 29, looks after her father, but is registered as able and willing to work at the local Labour Exchange. After receiving relief of 5/- weekly for five years, she was offered and accepted work at the Enniskillen Workhouse, where she was engaged at the job for a few weeks. Relieving Officer Cathcart said when the girl started to work he removed her from the relief list, and now that the work finished he brought her ease forward to consider the resumption of the weekly relief. Mr, J, Burns said there was a dearth of domestic servants. Was this girl willing to work? R.O. Cathcart — She is registered for work at the Exchange. Mr. A. Wilson — When she is registered for work it makes it legal for you to give her relief. Mr. W. A. Thornton — You are not hound to.

Mr. McKeown — Her father has served in two wars. Some of those people who are talking have big sons and they won’t send them out to keep up the Empire. This man fought in two wars and in his old age his daughter is watching him and is willing to go out to work when she can get it. Some of the people here won’t send their own sons out to fight for the Empire. Mr. Stewart proposed that relief be not granted to the girl, and Mr. J. Burns seconded. Mr. C. McKeown proposed that relief be restored, and Mr. D. Weir seconded.

For Mr. C. McKeown’s motion there voted: Lord Belmore, Messrs. Weir, Humphreys,  Clarke and McKeown—(5). For Mr. Stewart’s proposal a number of members—all Unionists—voted, and the Chairman (Mr. J. J. Coalter) said that this motion was passed.

THE PAST RECALLED. RECOLLECTIONS OF PETTIGO DISTRICT. In an recent issue of the ‘‘Fermanagh Herald” there was news of my native village school which not only filled me with pride, but helped me to recall some of the happiest memories of my boyhood days, together with many little episodes as a pupil following the opening stages of that school. At a recent concert in Aughnahoo school, that grand old song—“Come to the hedgerows,” was sung by the children —a song which was taught to hundreds of children in the same school by its first Master—Mr. J. T. Lawton, M.A., 56 years ago, and who went to live in Wabana, Newfoundland, after his early retirement.

The reading of the concert report thrilled me as I am sure it thrilled other readers who had the good fortune to study under Mr. Lawton at Aughnahoo. He was a brilliant teacher capable at the time of teaching most subjects now taught only in Colleges and Universities. I wonder how many of my school-mates living to-day recall the happy times experienced during that period, when we used to scurry along the narrow road (now covered with grass) to the shores of Lough Erne during our periods of recreation and indulge in all sorts of fun and frolic. Well I remember how when going to school with turf under our arms and school fees in our pockets we skated and slid on the ice-covered pond at Letter quarry—a place that received the attention of our Master on more than one occasion as it tended sometimes to keep us late from reaching the school.

The concerts organised by the same Master in the school would compare very favourably with the best of our modern concerts, and the excellent performances of the pupils in the production of many sketches which were special features of the programmes, coupled with the magic lantern displays and talks given by the Master himself could not be excelled. He organised these entertainments at his own expense, gave numerous prized and made special presentations to those of us who worked as pupils to secure distinctions.

At those; concerts the school room was thronged, the parents of the children travelling miles at night over country-side and mountain paths, carrying hurricane lamps and lanterns to witness an entertainment that left them spellbound. I could go on writing ad lib., on the humour and beauty of those concerts and particularly on the superb qualities of our old Master.

Aughnahoo school—what memories that old building brings to me! To-day or at least when last I saw its walls bore traces of the bullets of the “Tans” during the siege of Pettigo. The school has been the Alma Mater of many who have attained distinction in the professional and commercial spheres. The school lies in the heart of a most beautiful countryside. It is situated almost on the shores of Lough Erne-that great expanse of water with its sandy beaches and numerous wooded, islands. The Glebe, with its ancient Manse and acres of lawn, adorned with huge trees of sycamore shape and the grey ruins of Castle Termon Magrath tower high over the undergrowth. These are distinctive marks in the landscape. Then .there are the hills of Drumheriff, with their beautiful slopes of green pasture and silvery streams and the meadows, beneath where many of us used to gather the seasonable flowers on our way from school and fill the vases which adorned the mantel pieces in our homes.

Yet we did not in those far-off days appreciate all the natural gifts and beauties of our homeland. As in the case of myself later generations of pupils no doubt carry treasured memories of their time in Aughnahoo school. The exiled Irish and particularly those from rural Ireland all carry pleasant recollections of their carefree days at school and their innocent forms of enjoyment. Modern life unfortunately is devoid of the happy features of everyday life prevalent when myself and my comrades went to that dear old school. I am glad, however, that in many respects those features of modernity have not seriously permeated the life of my native district.

In those good old days to which I refer on Sundays and holydays the Waterfoot, in so far as assemblages were concerned, was a centre somewhat similar to the Bundoran of the present day. Fathers and mothers with their children and crowds of young people could be seen trekking along from the village to spend the afternoon along the sandy shores of Lough Erne, and large numbers basked in the Sun near the old walls or ruins of Castle Termon Magrath. In fact the Waterfoot was a household word in those  days, but I .regret to say that on my last visit some three years ago and on a Sunday afternoon I did not see one person there. Of course times have changed and the people in some respects have also changed. Wake up Pettigo let us see a rebirth of the old ideas and old customs!

Patrick McCaffrey, 3 McNeill Ave., Prestwick, Ayrshire.

27-6-1942. SCHOOLS MEALS SCHEME FOR FERMANAGH. In a letter to Fermanagh Regional Education Committee, on Friday, the Ministry wrote regarding the committee’s decision to inaugurate a scheme for mid-day meals for children, in attendance at public elementary schools, under which children deemed necessitous would receive free meals, and non-necessitous would be required to meet the cost of the food.

The Ministry noted that the standard of necessity had been fixed at 5/6 weekly per head in the rural areas, and 6/- in the urban area. As regards the proposal that the cost of each meal should not exceed 2d, the Ministry was of the opinion that it would not be desirable to limit the cost to that amount, as it was doubtful if a suitable meal could be provided at that price. The Ministry suggested that one of its officers and an inspector should attend a committee meeting for consultation. Mr. Coffey said 2d was the sum left down as the cost of a meal for farm labourers, and surely, therefore it should suffice for children.

The Secretary (Mr. J. J. Maguire) said he had been in touch with practically all the teachers in the county, and one thing all teachers pointed out, was lack of cooking facilities either in the school or near hand. This, they thought, would prevent them from giving anything to children except cocoa, milk, bread, butter, or jam, or any, of those things. There were very few necessitous children. In many cases the teachers put this to the parents, who had said they would prefer to continue to provide the food for the children as at present, rather than pay for a meal.

Mr. G. Elliott— Has this committee approved of putting a scheme into operation? Secretary— They have. Mr. G. Elliott— I think it is a mistake.

Capt. Wray said the resolution was on the books. The 2d as an estimated cost was suggested by the Finance Committee, who thought that perhaps it might cover milk. It was very difficult to put an estimate on it. The Committee’s resolution in March was that it should be left to each individual school to determine the type of meal they thought best suited to their pupils. If 2d did not cover it the committee could make it 2½d. They would be able to judge better when they had practical experience of the working of the scheme.

The Secretary said that matter was put to the teachers, and 97 per cent of the replies he got were in favour of cocoa, milk, or something of that nature, with bread and butter if obtainable, or margarine; cold milk in summer and hot in winter. A lot of schools had schemes running at present. The majority of schools seemed to have some scheme of hot meals for children in winter, and it seemed parents provided their own supplies of cocoa and milk, and had it prepared in school during play hours by the teachers. Parents who could afford the price of milk would prefer to continue to supply their own cocoa and milk rather than pay for the milk in the school.

Capt. Wray asked did the Ministry say the Committee must fix a higher price, or merely suggest it was insufficient? The Secretary said the Ministry thought it would be insufficient. Mr. Elliott asked must they go on with the scheme. The Secretary said there was nothing compulsory about it. Mr, McKeown said the teachers were very sympathetic; the difficulty was securing a place near hand.

27-6-1942. TEMPO VICTUALLER SUMMONED. FALSE REPRESENTATIONS CHARGE. At Lisbellaw Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Hugh Tunney victualler, Tempo., was charged with having, on 21st March last, at Tempo, obtained rationed foods (11½ lbs. of lard) from William and Carson Armstrong, trading as Armstrong Bros., without a permit from the Ministry of Food; he was further charged with obtaining the lard by false representations. William and Carson Armstrong, trading as Armstrong Bros., were summoned for supplying rationed foods.

William Stewart, an inspector of the Ministry of Food, gave evidence that when he called at Tunney’s shop on 21st March he saw a quantity of lard in the window, which Tunney said he bought from Armstrong Bros. Tunney also told him that he was short of suet, etc., and was giving the lard away with beef to his registered customers. William Armstrong admitted that he sold the lard to Tunney, but on the condition that it would be given back to him. Armstrong said that he understood Tunney had a licence to buy lard, and that he was only obliging him until such time as he (Tunney) got his own supply in. Tunney in a statement said he promised to give the lard back, and that he led them to believe he had a licence to buy. Tunney had a licence to sell but no permit to Acquire. Tunney pleaded that it was “just a bit of a misunderstanding.” Armstrong Bros. representative said that Tunney told him he had a licence to sell the lard and witness said he would lend him this quantity of lard until he got his own supply in. Tunney said he would return it when he got his own supply in. Witness lent the lard to Tunney on that understanding. His Worship said that these regulations must be strictly kept. For obtaining rationed goods by false representations he said that Tunney had caused a lot of trouble, and must pay 40s and 2s costs, this to rule the charge for obtaining rationed goods. “I think,” added his Worship, “that Armstrong Bros, were honestly misled. Therefore, I let them off under the Probation of Offenders Act.”

 

27-6-1942. HELD TO BE DESERTER. BUNDORAN MAN’S CASE. Edward Doherty, stated to be a native of Bundoran, with a. temporary address in Duncairn Gardens, Belfast, appeared an remand before Mr. J. H. Campbell, K.C., R.M., in the City Custody Court on Saturday charged with, being a deserter from the Army. When accused was before the Court last Saturday he alleged he had never been in the Army, that it was a cousin of the same name who had deserted and who had now rejoined the Army and was serving somewhere in the Middle East. The case had been adjourned for defendant to produce his birth certificate. Mr. Walmsley, for the accused, said he had written to Dublin for Doherty’s birth certificate and he had not yet received any reply. District-Inspector Cramsie, produced a number of documents found on the accused. Henry Kerr said at one time he lived at Springtown, County Derry, beside William Doherty, an uncle of defendant, whom accused visited from time to time. He did not believe the accused was ever in the British Army. His Worship held that Doherty was a deserter and ordered him to be handed over to a military escort.

KESH COURT CASES. THREE MONTHS FOR THEFT OF BICYCLE. Kesh Petty Sessions were held on Tuesday, before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M. Patrick McCafferty, Drumshane, Irvinestown, was sentenced to three months’ imprisonment with hard labour for the larceny of a bicycle, value £10, the property of Wm John Mulholland, Derrylougher, Letter.

The R.M. said in the next similar case it would. Be twelve months’ imprisonment. Mr. Jas. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, prosecuted for the Ministry of Agriculture against John McDonagh, Drumcahey, for as alleged, illegally importing two head of cattle. An order for the forfeiture was in respect of one of the animals.

Patrick. J. Monaghan, Drumskinney, was summonsed for acquiring an excess quantity of flour, namely 62 stones, also for harbouring prohibited goods – 10 stones of sugar.

Defendant was fined £2 in each case.

Robert Moore, Mullaghmore, was summonsed for carrying prohibited goods at Movaran, namely 10 fruit loaves, 52 loaves, and 28 currant loaves. A sentence of two months’ imprisonment was ordered. Notice of appeal was given.

Frederick McCrea, Lisnarick, for making a false statement regarding 801bs, of tea, was fined £2, and was given the benefit of the Probation of Offenders Act for failing to furnish particulars of rationed goods. The tea was forfeited.

27-6-1942. FIVE YEARS FOR STEPHEN HAYES. STATEMENT IN COURT. Stephen Hayes, former Chief of Staff of the I.R.A., who gave himself up to the police last September after he had escaped, wounded, from a house in Rathmines, Dublin, where he said he had been held captive after having been “court-martialled,’’ and sentenced to death by members, of an illegal organisation, was last week end sentenced to five years’ penal servitude by the Special Criminal Court, in Dublin, on a charge of having unlawfully usurped and exercised a function of government. He was described as Chief-of-Staff of the I.R.A. He refused to plead and, when asked if he wished to give .evidence on oath or call witnesses, replied that he did not. Later, when the Court—which had entered a plea of not guilty on his behalf—announced that he had been found guilty of the charge, he said he wished to make a statement, and from a slip of paper read the following:— ‘For over twenty-five years I have been associated with the national movement, and in all that time I have done what I considered my duty, conscientiously and according to my lights, fighting as a soldier always. I can swear before God that I have never been guilty of a treacherous or traitorous act against the Irish Republic. Neither have I committed any crime against the Irish people.’

A letter written by Hayes during his nine months’ interment in Mountjoy Prison was produced as the basis of the charge preferred against him.

1942, Fermanagh in Ulster Final and Glangevlin.

13-6-1942. There was a sequel to the shooting of Constable Thomas J. Forbes, Dungannon, when a claim for £10,000 compensation was brought by the widow Mrs. Evelyn Forbes, Donaghmore Road, Dungannon, at Dungannon Quarter Sessions.

Mr. Chambers said that Constable Forbes was killed by gunmen in Ann St., Dungannon, on Easter Saturday morning, 4th April. The circumstances of his death were that on this morning deceased and three other police were engaged in carrying out a search of premises belonging to James Rafferty, of Ann St. In the course of the search a fracas arose between the police and certain individuals, who had not been traced, and as Constable Forbes wag pursuing some of the wrong doers across Ann Street he was shot and seriously wounded. He lingered for some time and died in Dungannon Hospital on 8th April.

Mr. Chambers said the difficult question which his Honour had to determine was the financial value of the loss of this constable. Deceased was aged 40 and his salary was approximately £6 per week, and he was a young constable who was given the highest testimonials by the District-Inspector. He had a widow and ten children, the eldest of whom was 14. Deceased was exactly the type of young man who was presently required in the R.U.C. and his prospects of promotion to sergeant were excellent, and that would, have brought with it increased pay. Since his death the authorities had allowed the widow a total of £160 pension per annum for herself and children.

He submitted that the very minimum compensation which, he would consider adequate was £6,000.

Sergt, J. H. Gilmer gave evidence of seeing Constable Forbes running across Ann Street in pursuit of some gunmen when there an outbreak of revolver or rifle fire and Constable Forbes fell to the ground. His Honour awarded £5,000 compensation—£2,500 to Mrs. Forbes and £2,500 to the children and allowed costs. He fixed the entire Co. Tyrone as the area of charge.

13-6-1942. RESTRICTIONS REMOVED ON 26-COUNTY BREAD SUPPLIES. As from Tuesday all restrictions on the supply of bread in the Twenty-Six Counties have been removed. Deliveries of flour are also being increased to traders up to the quantity they received last year. This announcement was made on Monday by Mr. Sean Lemass, Minister for Supplies. The public are at liberty, the Minister stated to go to any suppliers they liked and purchase all the bread they wanted. This did not mean, the Minister emphasized, that more bread than was required should be purchased, and. it was still urgently necessary to avoid waste of bread or flour.

NEARLY 50 YEARS BACK. AN ENNISKILLEN TEAM OF THE MIDDLE NINETIES

For nearly fifty years the picture of a well-known Enniskillen soccer team, of the last century hung in the hallway of the late Mr. George Elliott’s house at the Brook, Enniskillen, and many a time the famous old Fermanagh penny-farthing bicyclist would exchange recollections of it with the young goalie of those days, Mr. James Gillin (Skipper); now the well-known rabbit and poultry dealer and vegetable merchant.

When Mr. Elliott, who is also in the picture as a referee, died his wife expressed the wish that on her passing the picture should go to Mr. Gillin. This wish was fulfilled a few days ago, some weeks after Mrs. Elliott’s death, when Captain Jimmy Lowans, R.A.S.C, (an Enniskillener from Queen St., who joined the Army at 16 and has now 23 years’ service) handed over the picture to Mr. Gillin.

Some of the older generation will remember the stalwarts of Enniskillen F.C. Cup team, 1894-95. The goalie was Jimmy Gillin; the two full backs D. O’Connell and J. McGregor. The halves were T. H. Wilson, a former proprietor of McNulty’s pub, the Brook; W. McCoy and F. J. Morris, brother of Albert Morris, who, I believe, was a quartermaster on the Inniskilling Fusiliers. The forwards were J. C. Steele (Capt.), a clerk in the Ulster Bank; W. Morrow, E. Mulligan, who was then proprietor of McLoughlin’s pub., Fairview, later went to America and died .there; H. Reynolds, a brother-in-law of Mr. Tommy Harvey; and ‘Bap’ Henderson, now a retired postmaster living at Dungannon. Reserve was J. Jackson, whose father, an insurance superintendent with the Prudential, lived at Orchard Terrace,

Mr. Elliott, who also appears in the photograph as referee, was a native of Enniskillen and in his early years was a manager of Thos. Plunkett, Ltd. He then went into business for himself  in the Hollow. Like the late Mr. Ritchie, father of the present, editor of the “Fermanagh Times,” he was a leader, in many sporting movements and was a generous supporter of and contributor to several teams. In fact, any young people starting a new team went to one or other of, the pair to head the list of subscriptions. They were always sure of a generous contribution. The football dress of the team is somewhat different from those of the present. Jerseys had not then replaced shirts, and the “shorts’’ were very long, extending below the knee, and some at any rate were buttoned in the style of breeches below the knee. Belts were worn by most of the players, and—an incongruous sight nowadays—moustaches, were common. Eight of the players and the referee had them. Ordinary boots, only some of them studded, was football footwear. Of the entire team, the only one still in Enniskillen is Mr. Gillin.

JUNE 6, 1942. GIRL STEALS TWO BICYCLES. Three Months’ Jail Sentence at Enniskillen. A young Six-County land girl pleaded guilty to three charges of larceny at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, before Mr. J. C. Austin, R.M. She was Annie O’Brien, whose address was given as Sallysgrove, Florencecourt, and she was charged with (1) stealing a bicycle, the property of John Sherry, Skea, Arney, value £4, on 6th November, 1941; (2) stealing a pair of spectacles in their case, from the house of Mrs. Emily Rea, Carran, Ballygawley, with, whom she had been employed; (3) the larceny of a lady’s cycle, the property of Oliver Gilhooley, Enniskillen, on 9th May. Arising out of the latter case, Mrs.  Georgina Abercrombie, Corryglass, Letterbreen, was charged with aiding and abetting.

Head Constable F. Thornton, prosecuting, said O’Brien went to Ballygawley to work as a Land Army girl and she stole the glasses from her employer. Last November she stole a bicycle in Enniskillen and sold the second, machine she stole on 9th May, giving £1 of the £2 she received, from Mr. McNulty, a cycle agent, to Mrs. Abercrombie.

Sergt. Clarke, Letterbreen, read statements alleged to have been made by the defendants, admitting the offences with which they were now charged.

He told the R.M. that his own opinion was that O’Brien, was a tool in the hands of others. Mrs. O’Brien had called at the barracks and said she would not let her daughter (the defendant) return home. That being so there was no person to look after her. O’Brien said she had no one to look after her, but a friend in Enniskillen. The police, however, refused to consent to her release from the Court to go to this house. His Worship said he was sorry to have to send O’Brien to jail, but in the circumstances he had no option. Mr. W. T. McClintock, B. Agr., informed the Court that the Land Army would not allow O’Brien to return to work under their jurisdiction. O’Brien was sentenced to three months’ imprisonment on each of the three charges, the sentences to run concurrently. Abercrombie, who agreed to return to her husband, was bound over for twelve months.

COTTAGE TENANCY. CATHOLIC OCCUPANT WAS EVICTED. Approval of the granting of the tenancy of a labourer’s cottage at Fartagh to Mr. W. T. Elliott, Whitehill, Springfield, a Protestant, was given by Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday. It will be remembered that the house was occupied by Mr. Millar, a Catholic, since 1911 and that on his death his daughter. Miss Mary K. Millar, who lived with him sought the tenancy, but was refused on a party vote. Later the Council took ejectment proceeding against Miss Millar and she was evicted. Mr. Murphy at the Council meeting on Tuesday, remarked, “You can take me as dissenting from that decision. She has been evicted I am opposed to the whole thing.”

 

MAY 30, 1942. THE ULSTER JUNIOR FINAL. Antrim Defeat Fermanagh at Enniskillen

In a game in which Fermanagh failed to show the form that brought them to the final, Antrim won the Ulster Junior Football Championship at Enniskillen on Sunday by 3 goals 10 points to 1 goal 6 points.

It was a rousing game, and Fermanagh struggled very gallantly with an Antrim team that was much faster and was a great deal superior in attack. Fortunately, in Smith, who was seen at his best, and McQuillan, hampered by a stiff ankle, and Johnston, Fermanagh had a great back line, with a sound goalie in F. Murray. These did a great deal to help Fermanagh hold the swift-moving, goal-seeking Antrim lads, whose front line was in devastating form. The swoops of Armstrong, McKay, Donnelly, McCallin and Webb was delightful to watch. Their understanding was complete, and their ball-passing and foot control, as well as hand control, could not be bettered. It will be surprising if Antrim do not go on to win the Irish, championship this year. It is a tribute to Fermanagh’s defence that they held this Antrim line fairly well for most of the game, though, of course, scores came but there was no collapse of the Fermanagh defenders. Right to the end, there were two teams in it, and Antrim had to give of their best to win.

O’Dowd and O’Grady gave sound displays, but the best half was Allen, while McDermott played his best game of the year in centre-field, particularly in the second half when the, defenders began to realize that Durnian was being too closely watched and that McDermott was the man to make use of. Durnian did not shine as in former matches, but that was because Antrim placed two or three players to hold him, and they were given a hot time by the grand Fermanagh mid-fielder. McCaffrey and Clarke showed their best form of the year, and Duffy was a useful player, but the only score getter was An tAthair Dermot Mahon.  Gerry Magee played a. dashing game, but it was his day off for scores. He missed chances innumerable. Courtenay as centre three-quarter was not a patch on his predecessor, Feely, for whose dropping the selection committee will have a lot of explaining to do to Fermanagh supporters.

The Fermanagh attack never developed cohesion. Amongst the lot there was only the one score-getter of whom one might be sure—Mahon. The Antrim defence, of course, was brilliant. Harry Vernon was a great goalie, and McMahon, Gallagher and Leddy was a trio of backs that were sound as rocks in defence. The Antrim men were adepts at minor fouls, many of which, the referee missed. The referee, Alfie Murray, Armagh, was strictly impartial, but he missed a great many minor things which, while not serious in themselves, added up very considerably to Antrim’s advantage.

A few minutes before the end, the game was held, up for a short time while spectators crossed the side-line after an incident in which a Fermanagh spectator struck a linesman. It was an unfortunate incident, because the game had been clean and the players on both sides a sporting lot. So it was too, with the spectators with the exception of two or three at most. It is a pity these few fellows did not realize what serious consequences on public opinion their ignorant partisanship is likely to have. Spectators should control their curiosity on such occasions and remain outside the pitch because their invasion of the pitch out of curiosity gives a very wrong impression to other onlookers, particularly to those who are delighted to see, or to imagine they see trouble at a Gaelic game, and one of such importance.

THE PLAY. Antrim right from the start played like a winning team and it was unfortunate for Fermanagh that Frank Johnston early on, in trying to clear his lines, should have boxed a ball into his own net for a goal. This set-back foreshadowed the end, though Fermanagh fought very gallantly to make up the deficit. It was the failure of the forwards that prevented a levelling up in the early stages. Opportunities went a begging and the forward men struggled futilely with the. rock-like Antrim defence.

McCallin drew first blood for Antrim in an early raid, and after Allen had stopped another invasion, Clarke lobbed to Magee who was beaten for possession. Armstrong shot a rising ball goal wards and it grazed the crossbar for a point, missing a goal by inches. Gallagher kicked to Donnelly, who lobbed in a strong shot, which Murray saved. Play swung round and Clarke led a great attack which finished with a terrific Clarke drive for goals, but Vernon was almost unbeatable. Smith took the ball from Webb’s foot when he was about to shoot for goals from close range.

The game was moving very fast, with Antrim having a slight advantage territorially. Roland was the big man at centre-field, and it was hereabouts that one first began to miss the Feely touch for Fermanagh. Courtenay was very weak. O’Grady kicked forward to Mahon, who missed a shot for goals, and another O’Grady kick forward to centre proved similarly fruitless, the forwards being beaten by the Antrim defence.

Twelve minutes had now gone, with Fermanagh two points down. From O’Grady, Courtenay got possession and missed, and in a number of succeeding attacks Fermanagh, now more in the. picture were similarly unfortunate. Duffy missed twice from 25 yards. From Durnian the ball went to Magee, who created a nice opening and passed to Mahon. The latter put in a stiff drive and Vernon, to save has net, had to punch across the bar for a point. Magee was again in possession and within four yards of goals when he drew to kick, and was shouldered behind, along with the ball, by the Antrim fulls.

Fermanagh were now on top, but chances were being missed as quick as they came. The inevitable happened. Antrim’s turn came. Away went the McKay, Armstrong, McCallin combination, and Joe Donnelly from the wing swung in a heavy lob. Frank Johnston tried to punch clear and put the ball in his own net.

Eighteen minutes from the start Kevin Armstrong increased the Antrim lead by a further point bringing it to four points.

Switching round to attack, Fermanagh went forward; in a clever Clarke, Mahon, Magee movement which ended with Magee punching the-ball into the goalie’s hands.

Courtenay caught from the kick-out and put across to Mahon, who pointed cleverly. Webb pointed for Antrim and McCaffrey replied quickly with a lovely point, kicked from a ground ball for Fermanagh. Only a goal now divided the scores—Johnston’s unfortunate one, but for which it would have been even pegging—but Antrim began a swift advance which McKay finished with a goal. Quickly they returned and Murray saved cleverly, but from thirty yards out Armstrong pointed, making the lead seven points. Campbell, after a fine solo run, was going through when stopped brilliantly by McQuillan. It seemed Campbell had over held and Fermanagh supporters expressed their disappointment when the free was given to Antrim. From, this kick, Durnian cleared in great, style and was loudly cheered. Fermanagh tried again to pierce the Antrim back line, but failed although Mahon, Durnian and Magee were in the attempt, and Antrim, had a piece of bad luck when with the Fermanagh defence beaten, a forward kicked wide. O’Grady and Allen threw back another Antrim raid, but Webb later got through for a point which was offset in a minute by Mahon’s lovely shot across the bar. McCaffrey followed with another minor to make the half-time scores

Antrim—2 goals 5 points. Fermanagh,—5 points.

Fermanagh were first away after, the resumption, but missed, and Donnelly in an Antrim attack pointed. Johnston sent to Durnian, whose beautiful solo run ended with a pass to Courtenay, who missed. McKay pointed for Antrim, and Durnian was going forward for a score when badly fouled. From the free he kicked a point,

Poland in midfield and Armstrong were in brilliant form for Antrim and were keeping the Fermanagh defence hotly engaged. Webb got through for a point before McDermott effected a good clearance and sent Fermanagh forwards to the attack. McMahon, a great back, beat off the raid, but McCaffrey and Clarke were persistent and for some time Fermanagh showed traces of their form. Eventually, Antrim forced the attackers back towards midfield, and it seemed the attack was over when O’Grady got possession of the ball thirty yards out and, with a terrific drive, sent into the net for a Fermanagh goal.

Once more the lead had been reduced to five points, but it was always Antrim that got going when Fermanagh’s chances were brightening. Webb gave to Armstrong, who pointed and the lead was now six points. After a good movement had brought Fermanagh to scoring range, Magee missed twice, and the whole attacking force was in the worst possible shooting form. Antrim seemed infected, for Webb, a sure marksman, missed badly from close in. Durnian kicked out to Courtenay, who missed badly.

Swiftly, Antrim went in to the attack, and only a magnificent McQuillan clearance saved the situation for Fermanagh The ball had struck the crossbar and was falling, amidst three Antrim men when McQuillan threw himself on the ball as it rebounded, rose with it between his legs and forced his way out of the danger zone. Fermanagh forwards were again wide of the mark when a sustained attack provided them with several chances. Clarke had a good try when he kicked a strong ball goal wards, but Vernon cleared confidently. Antrim swung round, and inside a few seconds McKay had a goal through in striking contrast to the Fermanagh attackers’ failures. Again Fermanagh advanced and a miss was registered. Magee got from the kick-out and put in a sharp punched ball, which Vernon saved in great style. Before the end Armstrong pointed again.

Final scores Antrim—3 goals 10 points. Fermanagh—1 goal 6 points.

The teams – Fermanagh — Murray, Johnston, McQuillan, Smith, O’Dowd, O’Grady, Allen, Durnian, McDermott, McCaffrey, Courtenay, Clarke, Duffy, Magee, Mahon.

Antrim — Vernon, Leddy, McMahon, Gallagher, Campbell, Murphy, MctKeown, lienfestv, Poland, McKay, Armstrong, Webb, Donnelly, McAteer, McCallin.

FIXTURES FOR SUNDAY, 31st MAY.

Senior Football League,

Derrylin O’Connells v. Harps—P. Maguire, Lisnaskea v. Teemore — P. Hueston, Newtownbutler.

Junior Football League.

Mulleek v. Devenish (referee by agreement); Derrygonnelly v. Drumavanty, Rev. Fr. Duffy; Ederney v. Tempo, Rev. Fr. Mahon.

All matches on grounds of- first-named clubs at 5 p.m. (Ex. S.T.). Further fixtures in above competitions will be made at a Co, Board meeting.to be held shortly.

CAMOGIE. FERMANAGH COUNTY BOARD.

At a meeting of the County Board held on Sunday, Rev. T. Maguire, P.P., presiding, the following fixtures were made;

31st May—Division I.—Enniskillen v. Cavanacross; referee, Mr. S. Nethercott. Division II.—Cleenish v. Derrylin, referee Mr. M. McBriem, P.E.T.; 4 p.m. (E.S.T.). Matches on grounds of first, mentioned.

7th June—Division I.—Newtownbutler travels to Enniskillen to play the winners. Division II.—If Cleenish wins they travel to play Kinawley; if Derrylin, wins, Kinawley travels to play in Derrylin.

14th June—Fermanagh v. Tyrone, at Enniskillen.

The date of county semi-final will be later announced and also place and date of final into which Towra has got a bye.

All clubs are earnestly requested to carry out their fixtures on the dates appointed so that the competition may be finished before July and a new one started.

Clubs having home matches are hereby reminded of the rules regarding the marking of the playing pitch, etc., which will be strictly enforced this year. J. GALLAGHER, Sec.

JUNE 13, 1942. By EAMON ANDERSON. (CONTINUED FROM LAST WEEK) I said in last week’s article that there were a few tyrants shot in Fermanagh in the old days. One of these was a bailiff and grabber named Cowan, who lived in Drumroosk, near Kinawley village. He had evicted a number of tenants and grabbed some of their farms, so both the Protestant and Catholic tenants of this particular estate combined to get arid of him. They gathered around his house one night with guns and fired through the windows at him. He took refuge in the fireplace, of the parlour and from this, vantage point he fired out through the windows at his attackers and is believed to have wounded some and even killed one of them as a man disappeared that time and never was seen or heard of more, but the whole affair was kept very secret and was only talked of in whispers among the old generation. Some of the attackers got a ladder and got up on the roof and fired down the chimney at him and killed him. The house and place where he lived had been grabbed by him from a Protestant farmer whom he had evicted. Some say that the other man who disappeared at the time was really killed by Cowan’s attackers, as they were afraid of him, that he would turn King’s evidence. It. was even said that he was carried up into the Cuilcagh mountains and thrown down into a bottomless hole—just as, the Ribbon men did with Dominick Noone, the informer, in the mountains near Derrygonnelly in 1826. After the lapse of more than a century the whole affair is shrouded in mystery. In North Fermanagh not far from Irvinestown a certain  landlord evicted his tenants wholesale during the Famine years and many of them perished on the roadside of cold and want. One whole family died in this way —out in the snow—father, mother and all the children, except one boy, who eventually reached America and after many years amalgamated a great fortune. He came back to Ireland on holiday and stopped in a hotel in his native place. One day he went to visit the landlord’s castle. He sent in his card and was immediately admitted as a wealthy American. He was shown into the drawing room and entered into conversation with the landlord. After a short while the American tourist pulled a revolver out of his pocket and fired and killed the man who he looked on as the murderer of his father and mother. He waked out, took the train to the nearest port and got safe back to America. On Naan Island in Upper Lough Erne, not far, from Knockninny Rock, is the ruins of an old castle which once belonged to the Maguires. But in the Plantation times the Maguires were dispossessed of it and almost everything else belonging to them. At one time, well over a century ago, this castle was inhabited by a man named Burleigh. The point of Naan Island was called by the old Irish-speaking people of Naan and the surrounding countryside after this individual—by the sinister name of Gub-na-Stiopa (in English)—“The Blackguard Point”—but it is really a much stronger word than “blackguard,’ for Burleigh like Lord Leitrim and too many of the landlords and tyrants of those days imagined that he owned his tenants’ woman’ folk as his tenants’ body and soul, and all the rest of his tenant’ possessions. Perhaps the worst offender in this way was the notorious Lord Leitrim—who for his unspeakable villainies, was shot in Donegal on the 2nd of April, 1878. The South Leitrim part of his estates extended to within less than an hour’s cycle ride of where I live, therefore from the old people of that district I have heard many tales about him. For tyranny, cruelty and pride, there was hardly his equal in all the long records, of human history. Most landlords in Ireland showed some leniency to at least their Protestant tenants, but not so Lord Leitrim, as the following tale will show.

A certain Protestant farmer, a tenant of his near Newtowngore, paid him £40 a year of a rack-rent for 5 cows grass, and in those days it was as hard to make £40 off land as to make £120 now so the poor man and his family were at last reduced to rags, as they could not buy “a stitch for their backs.” Once when he was going to pay his rent to his lordship’s castle at Lough Rynne, in Upper Leitrim, he was so much ashamed to appear in his ragged state that he borrowed an overcoat from his parish minister to cover his rags. He was shown up to the office and paid his half-year’s rent and then Lord Leitrim walked a bit down the avenue with him fingering and admiring the fine velvet coat. Unfortunately the man did not tell him that it was a borrowed one, so Lord Leitrim went back into the office and said “Raise that man’s rent £5 a half year, he has a good coat on his back and seems to be getting prosperous!” On his estates in Donegal some people came to him for the site or a Protestant church. He would only give them a lease for 12 months so that they would have to be coming on their knees to him at the end of every year to have the lease renewed— all to pamper his pride. Another tenant of his in Leitrim broke a lea field and set potatoes in it without getting leave from his lordship. No one could dare break a field or make any changes or improvements in their farm without getting leave from him, but in this case when the man went to him he was away for a few weeks so the farmer said 1 will set the field of potatoes anyway and explain it to him after. So he and his sons put in the whole spring putting, in the field of potatoes with spades and then he went and told his lordship. “Why did you not come and tell me before you broke the field,” he said. “I did come but you were not at home,’’ said the man. But Lord Leitrim compelled him to turn down every sod and level the field and take out every seed potato he had planted in it, an almost impossible task. When that was done it was too late to put in any more crop that year. It did not matter if the man’s family starved if Lord Leitrim’s pride was satisfied. Another man made a long ditch along the roadside in his farm without getting leave to do so. Lord Leitrim passed in his coach every day while the job was being done and never said anything till it was almost finished when he went to the man and said “Who gave you leave to do that job. Why did you dare to start it without consulting me?” The man pretended not to know him. “Oh he said, Lord Leitrim passed in his coach every day and he seemed to approve of it so when it pleases him it is all right.” Lord Leitrim’s pride was satisfied so he left without another word. He had also an estate in Galway on the shores of Lough Corrib and owned the whole town of Cong and the countryside around it. A young woman named Joyce —a school teacher—was going home from school one evening in that place. Lord Leitrim spied her at a distance and followed her and caught up with her in a lonely place. The girl’s shouts and screams brought a young man also named Joyce running from a distance and he gave Lord Leitrim a thrashing that half killed him. The relations of the young man and Miss Joyce were immediately evicted and the young man got ten years penal servitude for the beating of Lord Leitrim. In any other civilised country in the world it would be his lordship who I would get the penal servitude for his criminal attack. Among so-called uncivilised peoples such as the North American Indians and the African Negros such a crime would be punished by instant death under the most fearful tortures. But under the “wise and just’’ laws which prevailed in Ireland at that .time, the lord of the soil owned his tenants, body and soul and could do what he wished on his own estate and was judge and jury and witness all rolled into one.

Miss Joyce went on her knees to the Lord Lieutenant in Dublin to have the unjust sentence on young Joyce revoked. The Lord Lieutenant at first refused, but Miss Joyce then went to his lady and she prevailed on her husband to reprieve young Joyce and set him at liberty. But Lord Leitrim soon had his revenge—even against Queen Victoria’s Viceroy of Ireland. The Lough Corrib district is one of Ireland’s beauty spots and a summer or two later the Lord Lieutenant went down there on holidays. But under threat of instant eviction Lord Leitrim forbade any of his tenants in the town of Cong and district surrounding—hotel keepers, farmers, shopkeepers and all to admit the Lord Lieutenant or supply him with lodging, food or necessaries, so when he went there on holidays he found every door closed against him.

In one case where he had evicted a family from their house and farm, a harsh winter came on  and the family were starving on the roadside. A Protestant clergyman—taking pity on them, began to collect money for them, and went to Lord Leitrim for a contribution: “Sir,” said his lordship, “I would not give you as much as a blanket to cover their bones!”

At last the crimes of this monstrous tyrant could be tolerated no longer in a Christian country. Even if the law winked at his successes and encouraged him there still remained rifles and bullets and trusty men to use them. So on a spring morning in 1878 he was shot dead on the shores of Mulroy Bay in Donegal in spite of the fact that he was travelling under the protection of several car load of police. His slayers were never captured although the whole County Donegal knew who they were.

 

IN MEMORY OF THADY DOLAN. HERO OF THE LAND WAR IN GLANGEVLIN

Glangevlin, you’ve nurtured a hero,

Thady Dolan, who bravely deified,

The landlord and all his cursed minions

That sought, to extinguish our pride;

And bind us with fetters of slavery.

As sons of a down-trodden race,

‘Twas Thady, and Men of his courage,

That saved us from want and disgrace.

 

In the dark days of rack-rent and crow-bar

He rallied the strong, men of Glan,

And outlined for them his decision,

To meet tyrant, force with a “plan.”

In a stronghold by Nature provided

His soldiers he armed and prepared.

To fight bailiffs, and red coats, and peelers

The .might, of oppressors he dared.

 

For long years they sought to dislodge him

But for them he cared not a rap,

Three, hundred bold tenants were ready,

To sentinel the pass thro’the gap.

And when tyrants appeared with their hirelings,

The blast, of the horn sounded clear.

And the “bell” would ring out as a signal

For the army of Glan to appear;

 

Men and women came forth at the summons,

Determined to conquer or die,

Pikes, pitchforks, and scythe blades they carried,

And always the Red Coats did fly,

As rocks from the cliffs fell like hailstones,

Cutting lanes in the ranks of the foe,

And loud cheers of victory re-echoed,

Afar in the valleys below.

 

For eleven long years they battled,

Unconquered they were to the end,

’Neath the tyrant Annesley’s fury

The spirit of Glan would not bend,

In the little green fields ’midst the heather

They toiled, but no rent would they pay

To the robbers who o’er their forefathers

For a century or more had held sway.

God rest you, bold Thady your history

Survives tho’ you sleep ’neath the clay,

With Parnell and Davitt we rank you.

Your memory we reverence to-day.

And regret that you lived not to welcome,

The dawning of freedom and plan

For the glorious future of Eire,

In that stronghold of liberty, Glan.

 

The foregoing lines were suggested to me by Mr. Eamon Anderson’s vivid description of the Land War in Glangevlin.

PADRAIC J. O’ROURKE, Gortnadeary, Kiltyclogher.

 

SOLDIER’S DEATH IN ENNISKILLEN. Lance-Sergt. Charles Henry Bradshaw (37), unmarried, whose home is at Birmingham, was found dead in Enniskillen with a bullet wound in his neck. At an inquest on Thursday, evidence was given that he returned from leave on the morning of the 3rd June and was instructed to rejoin his unit, which had left, the following morning. About 11.30 p.m., Q.Q.M.S. Burchill beard a shot and on entering the guard-room, saw deceased in a sitting position in one of the cells with a rifle between his legs. Blood wag flowing from his neck. Death was instantaneous. A verdict was returned that death was due to shock and haemorrhage following fracture of the skull of a gunshot wound, self-inflicted. The verdict added there was no evidence to establish the mental condition of deceased prior to firing the shot.

BOY DROWNED IN LEITRIM. While bathing in a lake near Ballinamore, Co. Leitrim, last week, James Gordon (16), son of the late Captain Gordon, V.S., Mohill, got into difficulties and was drowned. With a number of other boys he had been attending a picnic.

POPULAR BELLEEK LADY WEDS. The marriage took place with Nuptial Mass at University Church, St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin, between Dr. Anthony Eustace, Assistant Medical Officer of Health for Burnley county borough, only son of Mr. James Eustace and the late Mrs. Eustace, of Dublin, and Miss Evelyn Dick, M Sc., H. Dip. Ed., third daughter of Mr. and Mrs. ,Y. H. Dick, Heath Lodge, Belleek, Co. Fermanagh. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Father O’Brien, D. D. The bride was given away her uncle, Mr. T. Meehan, Monaghan, owning to the illness of her father. The reception was held afterwards by the bride’s mother at the Shelbourne Hotel. Dr. Edward Power was best man, and Miss Gertie Dick was bridesmaid. The guests included Commandant Vivian de Valera.

FLIGHT-LIEUT. MISSING Nephew of Enniskillen Optician.

Flight-Lt. Wilfred Ronald Maitland, second son of Rev, W. Maitland and Mrs. Maitland, the Rectory, Tynan, Co. Armagh, who has been reported missing from air operations, is a nephew of Mr. W. Moore, Enniskillen, the well-known optician, of whose staff Flight-Lt. Maitland was for some time a member. Aged, 22, he was .described as “a navigator of exceptional merit.’ He lived in Enniskillen for eighteen months up till 1940, when he joined the Air Force.

 

SAPPER DROWNED AT DEVENISH. BODY MISSING.  Sapper John Morton, stated to be a native of Manchester, and who had been employed for the past 12 months at Enniskillen, was drowned while bathing near Devenish Island, Lough Erne, on Friday. Deceased had been bathing with two companions when he disappeared            suddenly, and though they repeatedly dived in an effort to locate him, his two friends reluctantly had to give up the attempt Dragging operations are in progress, but so far the body has not been recovered.

 

MINISTRY AND ENNISKILLEN APPOINTMENT. The Ministry of Home Affairs informed Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday that they were not prepared to reconsider their decision relative to the appointment of Miss Ethel Armstrong to the position of assistant in the Clerk’s office‘s until they had received the information asked for as to the qualifications of the other candidates for the job. The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) said he had given the Ministry the required information.

 

DERRYGONNELLY M.O. RESIGNS. Dr. Muriel M. Ferguson, medical officer of Derrygonnelly dispensary district, wrote to Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday (Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., presiding) resigning her position as from the 1st September. The resignation was accepted, and the Board decided to appoint her successor on the 14th July.

ORANGES TO REPLACE TEA FOR CHILDREN. Oranges will replace tea in the new ration books for children under five years to be issued in Britain on July 27. This is designed to conserve tea supplies.

BALLYSHANNON SOLICITOR BEREAVED. Second Lieutenant Alan F. W. Ramage (19), Royal Artillery, was fatally injured while motor cycling (on duty) near Lame last week. He was the only son of Capt. Ramage, well-known Ballyshannon solicitor and Mrs. Ramage, Laputa, Ballyshannon. District Justice O’Hanrahan, solicitors and Gardaí joined in an expression of sympathy to Capt. Ramage at Ballyshannon Court.

ANCIENT ENNISKILLEN DOCUMENTS. At a cost of £2, old Enniskillen documents of historical interest in connection with the town’s history—and presented some time ago to the Urban Council—have been photographed and the photographs are to be framed and hung in the Council Chambers. One of the documents, the Town Clerk told the Council on Monday, had been the subject of an offer of £100 from a collector. This document is the seal of appointment of the first anti-Irish governor of the town, Gustavus Hamilton. The others are notes or orders written by officers of the British garrison forces, to inferior officers. One is signed “Schomberg,” and they all relate to the period towards the end of the seventeenth century when the Dutch Prince William of Orange and the English King James were fighting on Irish soil for the British Crown.

Glangevlin Land War.

Fermanagh Folk Tales. By EAMON ANDERSON. THE LAND WAR IN GLAN.

Some few months ago I wrote in those columns about the wild range of mountains which lies to the west of us, here in Kinawley. This wild range is called the Cuilcagh range and is more than 40 square miles in extent, an uninhabited wilderness of mountain, bogs, rocks and cliffs and hanging precipices, including the Hanging Rock and the great cliff of Benaghlin and the mare immense cliffs of Cuilcagh also that famous Fermanagh beauty spot, the Marble Arches. The highest point of this .range is the Moat of Cuilcagh, 2,168 feet above sea level. It is the highest point in Fermanagh and commands a view of 17 counties. Walk a half mile west from the Moat across the great flat stony top of Cuilcagh and you look down the precipices into a wide and romantic valley. This is the valley of Glangevlin, where rises the Shannon, Ireland’s greatest river. This wild glen is surrounded on all sides by mountains 2,000 feet high. On the south side the only entrance to it is the Gap of Glan, which the great topographer John O’Donovan, described as the wildest place he had seen in all Ireland. On the north and north-west sides other gaps in the mountains open out to Blacklion and Dowra. In later articles I will describe the scenery of these wild regions—every square perch of which I have travelled in my time. Half of these wild regions lies in Fermanagh and the other half, including the valley of Glangevlin lies in West Cavan. Glangevlin takes its name from Gabhlin (Gevlin), the famous smith of the Tuatha De Dannaens, who flourished about 35 centuries ago. According to tradition here Gabhlin, the smith, dug out the iron ore from Slieve-an-Iarainn (the Mountain of Iron) that long range which closes in the west side of Glangevlin. The site of his forge is still pointed out along the infant Shannon, and even the gorge in the mountain, where he dug out his iron. But for the present I am going to leave the more ancient tales of Glangevlin and also the description of its wild and romantic scenery for a future date and go on to the Land War, which was fought more fiercely there than in any other district in Ireland. Glangevlin or Glan as it is more generally called is a parish in itself closed in from the outer world by the mighty ranges of Cuilcagh and Slieve an Iarainn and inhabited by about 300 families, descendants of Fermanagh Maguires, MacManuses, MacCaffreys and Cassidys, Cavan O’Reillys and MacGoverns, and Leitrim Dolans, and other clans further away who took refuge from Saxon extermination in this remote and barren valley during the last couple of centuries. Every time I go in through Glan Gap and enter the valley I think of Cromwell’s sentence on the Irish race: “To Hell or Connaught.” It is said that in Cromwell’s time the barony of Burren, in Co. Clare, to which the first batch of the Munster Irish were driven, contained neither water enough to drown a man; wood enough to hang, a man, or soil enough to bury him. There you have the description of Glan in a nutshell. The townland of Derrylahan (which contains the Shannon pot – a deep pool from which the infant Shannon flows), and several townlands around, are inhabited by the descendants of refugees from Macken, Co. Fermanagh; who went “on their banishment’ into this wild place to escape arrest and transportation after the terrible affair known as “Macken Fight,” which took place on the 13th of July, 1829. Although generations of hard toilers have reclaimed many little green fields among the heather and rocks, one of the descendants, of the Macken refugees told me the following story a few years ago—on one of the occasions when I went to visit the Shannon Pot—which will show how hopelessly barren the place was when they settled on it in1829. Here is the tale he told me:— ‘‘The first spring my grandfather was here he began to think of putting in a little crop. He had a little horse and he put two creels on the horse’s back and filled them with manure and started out with the manure through the wilderness around him to look for a spot where he might set a few ridges of potatoes. He went from place to place and from spot to spot, high and low driving his horse before him. He searched every square perch of two or three hundred acres around his cabin without finding one spot where a ridge of potatoes could be set. At the end of a long spring day he drove the horse back again and took his graip and emptied the two creels of manure out on the little, manure heap again.” The heathery barren pastures of the valley afford scanty herbage for a hardy breed of little mountain, cattle. On the vast mountain ranges above them on all sides hundreds of sheep are kept, and only for the sheep no one could exist in Glan. By dent of liming the heather and of tremendous labour with pick and crow bar little fields have been reclaimed for tillage. These fields are fenced with stone ditches and tilled with the loy (i.e., laide—a Gaelic name for a peculiar kind of spade). Not a tree is to be seen in Glan, not a whitethorn hedge or bush—even the hardy alder only grows a few feet high. Yet barren as the valley is, in the landlord days, for every acre of it a rack-rent had to be paid to the Earl of Annesley, a rack-rent that would hardly be expected to-day off the most fertile acres of Meath or Roscommon. The revolt of the Glan, people against landlordism and oppression shall live on in history and tradition, to the end of time. Their peculiar position walled in by the giant mountains gave them great help in the dozen years war which they waged against all the forces which the tyrant could bring against them. In the year 1879 when Michael Davitt started the Land League, a great local leader arose in Glan called Thady Dolan or Thady-Pheadar-Thadgh (pronounced Thady-Flather-Haig) as he was locally called in Gaelic—according to the custom of the district a man’s fathers and grandfathers Christian name is added on to him own to distinguish him from other people of the same name. And the Irish language has lived on in Glan to the present day and people still only middle-aged can remember a hundred of the old generation in that remote glen, who could not speak a single word of English. So Thady Dolan with the help of the parish priest and curate of the valley organised the people and started his plan of campaign. First of all—the more thoroughly to unite the people, he prevailed on them to give up all secret societies, such as Molly Maguireism and even Fenianism.

He had the same opinion as that great Irishwoman, still alive, Madam Gonne MacBride, that a straight and open fight against either tyrants or invaders is a hundred times better than trying to fight by secret methods, and also does away with the danger of spies and informers such as were to be found in all secret societies. Then he and the Glan people started Parnell and Davitt’s ”No Rent Manifesto” with a vengeance.. “Pay no rent until the landlord agrees to have a fair rent fixed.” This might mean of course—the .eviction of the whole people of the valley—but even so an outsider would hardly come in to take their barren lands, and even if he did, he would not be allowed to live long in this world! In these days a stranger even a tourist, entering Glan would be met at the Gap by Thady’s men, and unless he could show proofs that he was a real true man, he would not be allowed to enter the valley, and in addition he would get a few wallops of an ash-plant, that might leave him in hospital for a month. Not a single tenant in Glim paid a single penny of rent for eleven long years. Time after time every few months the agent sheriff and bailiffs with large forces of police and arrays of Red-Coats, marched in through the Gap to evict the people and in later times to seize cattle, sheep or other property yet every time the evictions and seizures were a farce and a failure. For Thady and his people had a hundred plans. A pair of sentinels were posted every day on the heights above the Gap. Every time the tyrants were coming—with their protecting army of police and military, the sentinels could see them coming on the road six or seven miles away. Then they would blow a mighty blasts on a cow’s horn which,

when heard back down the valley, would be taken up by other horns and then the chapel bell would be rang as a signal for every man and woman in the valley to gather with all the weapons they could lay hands on and prepare to meet the tyrant even if it meant the loss of their lives. Signals would be sent on into the neighbouring parishes of Ballinagleragh and Killinagh (or Blacklion) and armies of men armed with pikes, and pitchforks and scythe-blades fitted on to stout ash handles, would come trooping over the giant hilltops to help the Glan people. In return the Glan people would often be called out to help neighbouring parishes when necessary. The minute the chapel bell was rung as a signal every man in Glan, by order of the dauntless captain, Thady, had to stop whatever work he was at no matter how busy he was and gather up for the mobilisation. And woe to any Glan man who did not

promptly obey the signal! The last time I was in Glan a man, not too old either for the Land War in Glan was carried on well into the 1890’s, told me this tale: “My brother-in-law (giving his name) was as strong and as manly a man as there was in the parish, and was afraid of no man living. One day he put six bags of corn on six asses’ backs (that is the way they have to haul loads in these mountain places) and got a neighbour gossoon to help him to drive the asses I down to the mill at Dernatuan along the Shannon. The mill was only a short mile from his house, and he was half-way down his own lane to the road when suddenly the horns began to blow away up towards the Gap and then the Chapel bell began to ring—the signal for the men of Glan to gather up—the evictors were coming to throw out, if they could, a few of the more helpless families. As he was so far on his way to the mill he said to himself ‘Och, I’ll go on to the mill with the corn and take it off and the gossoon can bring back the asses; and I can be out with the gathering as soon as any of them. He was about a quarter mile from the mill when he met Thady Dolan on the road and about 50 men along-with him. Down every mountain lane in sight the people were hurrying to join the throng. “Did you mot hear the signal,” said Thady. “I did,” said the man, “but I was on my way to the mill and I’ll be with you in ten minutes.” “You will and a damn sight sooner,” said Thady, taking a sharp knife out of his pocket and ripping the six bags of corn from top to bottom and spilling all out on the road. “Get into the ranks, he thundered.’ ‘That will learn you and every other Glan man to get out the minute the signal, is given no matter what they are doing. ”When the military and police would be coming through the Gap huge masses of rock, several tons weight, previously loosened with crowbars, would come hurtling down the cliffs on both sides of the narrow, pass, cutting lanes in their ranks—often breaking bones and always forcing them to fly back for their lives. If they reformed and came on again at great risk and got on to the houses which were to be evicted for that day they would find the houses surrounded by a dense crowd of angry men and women armed with every conceivable rude weapon, each and every one of them ready to die rather than let the family be evicted. It seems that at this time the military had no legal power to fire on the crowd else there would often have been serious bloodshed on both sides. Strange to say the whole eleven years of open warfare passed with very few evictions, very few wounded and no loss of life.

In next week’s article I will give a further instalment on the Land War in Glan, also a song -“The Lament for Thady Dolan,” composed the day he went to his grave.

The landlord of Glangevlin was Earl Annesley, of Castlewellan in the County of Down. It is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created on 17 August 1789 for Francis Annesley, 2nd Viscount Glerawly, with special remainder to his younger brother the Honourable Richard Annesley. He had previously represented Downpatrick in the Irish House of Commons. The titles of Baron Annesley, of Castlewellan in the County of Down, and Viscount Glerawly, in the County of Fermanagh, were created in the Peerage of Ireland on 20 September 1758 and 14 November 1766 respectively for his father William Annesley, who sat as Member of the Irish Parliament for Midleton. Annesley was the sixth son of the Honourable Francis Annesley, fourth son of Francis Annesley, 1st Viscount Valentia.

The first Earl Annesley had several illegitimate children but no legitimate issue. He was succeeded (in the earldom according to the special remainder) by his younger brother, the second Earl. He had earlier represented seven different constituencies in the Irish Parliament and served as a Commissioner of Customs for Ireland. His eldest son, the third Earl, sat in the British House of Commons as the representative for Downpatrick. On his death the titles passed to his eldest son, the fourth Earl. He sat as Conservative Member of Parliament for Great Grimsby and was an Irish Representative Peer in the House of Lords from 1857–74.

He never married and was succeeded by his younger brother, the fifth Earl. He was a soldier and also represented County Cavan in Parliament as a Conservative. Between 1877 and 1908 he sat in the House of Lords as an Irish Representative Peer. His line of the family failed on the death of his only son, the sixth Earl, who was killed during the First World War. The late Earl was succeeded by his first cousin, the seventh Earl. He was the son of the Hon. William Octavius Beresford Annesley, sixth son of the third Earl. This line of the family failed in 1957 on the death of his son, the eighth Earl. He was succeeded by his third cousin once removed, the ninth Earl. He was the great-great-grandson of the Hon. Robert Annesley, second son of the second Earl. As of 2014 the titles are held by the ninth Earl’s third son, the twelfth Earl, who succeeded his elder brother in 2011. As a descendant of the first Viscount Valentia, Lord Annesley is also in remainder to this peerage and its subsidiary titles. The family seat was Castlewellan Castle, Castlewellan, County Down.

May 16th 1942. FERMANAGH FOLK TALES by EAMON ANDERSON. It is safe to say that the greater part of the military and police who were sent by the Government of the day into Glan and hundreds of other places in Ireland during the Land War, to help the tyrannical landlords to overawe the people, thoroughly detested the dirty work they were forced to perform. The following tale will help to bear out the truth of this. An old man named MacManus, who lived in this Kinawley district, told it to me some years ago. On a certain summer’s day in the 1880’s a large force of British military, tired and wearied with the long march, were returning to Enniskillen after one of the periodical raids on Glan. It is twenty miles from Enniskillen to Glan Gap, via Swanlinbar and Dernacrieve Cross and then up the mountain road from that. It is 8 miles more from the Gap down the valley to the Shannon Pot, and Glan extends some distance beyond that to where it meets the parish of Killinagh. The soldiers—foot-sore weary and thirsty— were passing through the Kinawley district on their way back to barracks at Enniskillen. Passing a spring on the roadside near a house, the captain stopped his battalion to let them and himself, have a drink of the spring water. He called at the neighbouring house for a mug or porringer and entered into conversation with the owner, telling him where they had been that day, and their errand. This English captain was horrified at the idea that any human beings should be expected to pay rent for the wild district he had seen that day. “Instead of being forced to pay rent for it, they should be paid, and paid well, for living in it,” he said.

In those times an old gent named Moore, who was Lord Annesley’s agent for Glan, lived in a comfortable house called Glan Lodge, about a half-mile outside the Gap. It would not be very healthy or safe for a man of his calibre to live inside the Gap, as anyone who has read last week’s article can guess! And even at the Lodge, where he lived, he did not consider himself safe for a moment for he had a large force of police in and around his house to protect him. night and day during the whole dozen years of the Land War in Glan. And he never ventured out of doors without this force of police around him and often a good part of Queen Victoria’s army as well. This old man, before the Land War started, and before the people were thoroughly organised, had evicted a number of the Glan people and tossed their houses. When he died, a year or two after the Land War was over and won, a local poet made a song on him. According to the song, old Moore, when he died, went to a certain place, we shall not mention! The climate of that place not being agreeable to him, he began to entreat the gentlemen (or devils) who were in charge of him to let him out and back to Glan, and he would atone for his past misdeeds by being kind to the people for ever:-—

 

Then out spoke old More, “If yiz let me back to Glan,

I’ll build for them fine houses and reinstate them in their land!”

 

The older generation of the Glan people tell the following story about his treachery, which happened at the very end of the Land War. The fight in Glan had been going on for a great number of years without the landlord and his henchmen gaining anything, or being able to collect a penny of rent, despite the great forces at their back. They were heartily sick arid tired of it, and perhaps the Glan people were a bit tired of it too, for no matter how warlike people are, it is not easy living in a constant state of vigilance and warfare for a dozen years. So the 300 odd tenants in Glan, with, Thady Dolan at their head, held a consultation, and decided that they would ask Father McGauran, the curate, to go out with an offer to the agent. This offer was nothing more or less than one third of the rack-rent they had been formerly paying, with all the arrears of the long years of the Land War wiped out completely. Father MacGauran walked out through the Gap and down to Moore’s, a distance of 4 Irish, miles from the Glan Chapel and priest’s house, and old Moore had a great welcome for him. “I have come, said the priest, “with an offer from the Glan people. If you agree to this offer (naming the figure—a reduction, of about 60 per cent.), we are agreeable to meet you at any time and place you appoint and sign, all papers.” ‘‘Can you make no better offer than that?” says old Moore. “No,” said the priest, “these are our final terms. If you do not agree to that the fight must go on.” Old Moore thought for, a long time, and then said: “Well, if you can do no better than that, I suppose we will have to take it and try to live on it:” He then made arrangements with the priest to meet the Glan people at the little village in the Centre of the, valley and come to final terms. The priest walked back through the Gap and down the valley, spreading the news as he went, sending word up every mountain lane to the people to come out that evening to sign the settlement. For the first time in a dozen years the vigilance of the Glan people relaxed and the sentinels left the mountain tops—and that was just what the treacherous old agent wanted. Father MacGauran was just finishing his dinner that afternoon when a breathless messenger rushed in crying: “The army is coming; the redcoats, the. redcoats! They are in through the Gap and coming down here as quick as they can march.” It was true. It seems that this was one of the days that the Redcoats were coming anyway. So old Moore in his deceitful mind, had seemingly agreed to the offer brought by the priest, so that he would put Thady Dolan and “the conquering heroes of Glan” off their guard for once and get, the people evicted, or their cattle seized, without giving them time to send out the signals and gather to oppose the invaders. Father MacGauran rushed out in great anger, at the way the agent had deceived him and, like Moses and Joshua of old, he held up his hands to Heaven and beseeched the Almighty to stop the tyrants and despoilers and their, army and save his people. Away up the road towards the Gap, in full view of him, a half-mile of’ the road was covered with marching troops. The nearest of them were over a mile away yet, the moment the priest held up his hands, the tyrant Moore and his protecting army stopped suddenly, as if struck powerless by an avenging angel. Not a step further could any of them come. After a long time in this position old Moore shouted to some of the Glan people nearby to go down and tell Father MacGovern to come up that he wanted to speak to him for a minute.

“No,” said the priest, “go back and tell him to tell the army to turn about and march out of Glan again, and then, maybe, he’d get power to come down here to me himself.” This was done, and when the last of the soldiers had disappeared through the Gap, old Moore came down, shamefacedly enough, to where the priest was still standing on the road. So he was glad to meet the Glan people and come to terms at last. A whole generation of the Glan people, many of them still alive, were eye-witnesses to the happening I have just narrated. Some modern sceptics may shake their heads at this story and say “Impossible.” But if you open the Bible you will find both the Old and New Testaments full of similar miracles. Open the Lives of the Saints and you will find the same. And there is the same God of Miracles in the 19th and 20th centuries that there was in the bible times and in the centuries of the saints. And who will deny that He can work miracles when necessary for the sake of His oppressed people in modern times as well as in ancient times.

A process-server had hard times in most parts of Ireland during the Land War. But no process-server ever dared to enter Glan. Outside the Gap in the neighbouring parish of Curlough—also very Mountainous—a process-server once started with a great sheaf of “prosses” to serve them on the people. A number of men with blackened faces met him and took the “prosses” from him. Owing to hurry for post, I must leave the “Lament for Trady Dolan” over till next week,

 

 

 

 

May 1942.

DUTY OF PEDESTRIANS ON ROADS. INTERESTING POINT IN IRVINESTOWN PROSECUTION. Ought pedestrians obey the road code and walk on the right-hand side of the road, or follow the custom and walk on the left? This question was discussed at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on. Friday, when a motorist was summoned for driving without due care, etc., arising out of an accident in which the car, travelling in the black-out, knocked down a soldier. Major Dickie, R.M., said it was apparent that defendant did not see the soldiers until he was right on top of them. Everybody knew that soldiers were likely to be moving out of the town about that hour, and surely defendant should have driven in such a way that he would have stopped in time. He (the R.M.) recognised that army uniforms were difficult to see in the black-out. Mr. P. J. Flanagan, LL.B., solr., defending the car driver, said the same thing could be said of the soldier, who knew there was traffic on that road, and he should have kept in. His Worship pointed out that the law said pedestrians had a perfect right to be on the road, and there was no obligation on them to be struggling along on the grass verge. Mr. Flanagan said pedestrians had no right to be all over the road.

His Worship—I do not say for a minute they were all over the road. All the Crown witnesses agree the soldiers were not over the centre of the road. His Worship added that at the present time it was much safer on the right hand side of the road at night. Mr. Flanagan said he understood the Code specified that side for pedestrians, yet if it was used they would be deemed to be negligent.His Worship remarked that in the case of traffic approaching from the front the pedestrian would have to clear into the hedge, and people objected to that. The case in question was that in which Thomas McCrossan, Irvinestown, was summoned under the usual two counts for careless driving and for not having a. P.S.V. licence. Daniel McCrossan was summoned for permitting the latter offence.

Gunner Kane gave evidence that when walking home from Irvines town on 21st March, at 11 p.m., he was on the outside of two other soldiers, with some soldiers in front and some behind. A car came up behind them, and knocked him down. He next found himself being attended by nurses in hospital. He was not seriously injured. Cross-examined, witness could not say why he did not hear the car before it struck him. They had been in Irvinestown for a night’s jollification. He did not remember sitting on a coat on the aide of the road and smoking a cigarette after the accident. Gunner Young said he saw the car go past with the last witness on the front of it between the mudguard and the bonnet. The car had no lights lit when it stopped. Gunner Haydon estimated the speed of the car at fifteen to twenty m.p.h. Gunner Wosley stated he saw Haydon pull the other two soldiers into the left as the car drew near.

Sergt. Kelly, R.U.C., gave evidence of finding the car without lights beyond the scene of the accident. The headlights were in order when switched on, and a side lamp had been broken off in the mishap. The road is 19 feet wide, at the spot where the accident happened. Thomas McCrossan swore he could not find his brother, who had contracted to bring three men out of the town, and he had to drive them, though not duty licensed for the. purpose. He was travelling on the centre of the road, and was just passing the soldiers when he heard the bump. When he stopped he switched off the lights. Later he found that the bulbs were blown. He had since taken out a P.S.V. licence. Daniel McCrossan testified to his having arranged to drive three men home, but was unable to get out in time to do so. He did not authorise his brother to drive the car. His Worship said it was not a bad case but drivers ought to drive within the circle of their own lights. For driving without due care Thomas McCrossan-was fined 40/- and 6/- costs. The second summons concerning the licence was dealt with under the Probation of Offenders Act. The summons against Daniel McCrossan was dismissed on the merits.

16-5-1942. BICYCLE WHEEL THEFTS. A Kinawley Man’s Experience. Thefts of a particularly mean type, of which cyclists are the victims, are now, with the shortage of cycles and accessories, becoming prevalent. A young man who left his bicycle outside a hall while at a dance in the Arney district found his front wheel stolen when the dance was over. Another close by had the tyres and tubes of his bicycle stolen. But a Kinawley man’s experience was worst of all. He cycled across the Border to Swanlinbar and left his bicycle on the street while he visited a house. When he emerged after some time, both, wheels had been removed from, his machine and stolen. He had to walk back across the Border with the frame on his shoulder. R.U.C. men took him to the barracks on suspicion of smuggling the frame, but on telephoning the Swanlinbar Gardaí they confirmed the man’s story that his wheels had been stolen. He had to do the rest of the journey on foot, carrying the frame on his shoulder.

16-5-1942. IDENTITY CARDS. People without National Registration Identity Cards, or with Cards which are inaccurate, will find difficulty in Obtaining new Ration Books, when they are due for issue next month. Anyone who has lost his or her Identity Card, or whose Card is inaccurate, should call at once at the local National Registration Office, which is usually the Food Office, and have the matter rectified. Some local Food Offices (see advertisement pages), intend, opening sub-offices, it which the public will be able to obtain new Personal Ration Books and Clothing Cards on production of properly completed Identity Cards and Ration Books, with the Reference Leaves accurately completed.

16-5-1942. EXCESS FLOUR AND MEAL SUPPLIES. SELLING EGGS TO A NEIGHBOUR. CHARGES AT CASTLEDERG. Before Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., at Castlederg Petty Sessions on Friday, Elizabeth Harkin, Garvetagh, was summoned for being in possession of an excess quantity of flour and oatmeal, Henry McAnea and Samuel Greer, both shopkeepers, Castlederg, were summoned for disposing of excess quantifies of flour and meal. Const. Wilson said he found two seven stone packs of flour and a ten-stone bag of meal in Harkin’s house on the 2nd March.. In. a statement she took full responsibility and said about six weeks ago she bought a bag of flour from McAnea and about two weeks later ordered another from him, as one bag had only lasted her six weeks. She also purchased the meal at McAnea’s about six weeks ago. – Witness interviewed McAnea, who said he only supplied Harkin with seven stones flour and ten stones meal. He had no hesitation in giving it as it was a long time since she had obtained any from him. Greer told witness that he supplied Harkin with seven stones flour on the 13th December. Witness seized eleven stones flour and 7½ stones meal. The R.M. said it was now permitted to buy any quantity of’ ‘points’ food legally acquired and a month’s supply of unrationed food. The R.M. applied the Probation of Offenders Act in all cases, and forfeited one sack of flour. The R.M. added that the prosecution was properly brought, and it was only the circumstances of the cases that caused him to deal leniently with them.

Robt. A. Scott, Drumclamph, was summoned for having an excess, quantity of flour, namely, 10 stones. Const. Irvine said on the 31st March he went to defendant’s place and was told by him that he received 3 or 4 bags of flour from his brother-in-law, Mr. Rosborough, Derry. Witness found five ten-stone bags. He seized three of them. There were five resident in the house and four full-time employees. In a statement he said while he was at Derry show, he called with his brother-in-law and told him, to send him some flour. He received eight bags of flax and five of flour. The supply would have lasted him two months. The R.M. applied the P.O. Act and forfeited two ten-stone bags.

John Love, Crewe, was summoned for selling eggs other than to a licensed collector. Jeannie Love, do., was summoned for selling eggs at a price other than at the maximum price, and for selling without a licence. James Donaghey, Faughan Bridge, Drumnahoe, Derry, was summoned for purchasing eggs otherwise than at the fixed price, for obtaining 1 lb. butter otherwise than according to the rationing regulations, and for having one lb. butter without authority. Annie O’Neill, Creeduff, was summoned for disposing of 1 lb. butter without authority.

PETROL SHORTAGE FOR AMBULANCES. SERIOUS COMPLAINT AT ENNISKILLEN. Difficulty in securing supplies of petrol for Enniskillen Union ambulances was referred to at the meeting of the Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry presiding. In a letter to the Board, Mr. John Cathcart, ambulance driver, said: “I beg to inform, you of the difficulties that exist in getting a. supply of petrol for the ambulances. When application, would be made for 140 units 80 would be supplied, and when application- for 80 was made 50 would be supplied. The number of coupons is insufficient to keep the ambulance service going, and on the 8th. inst. an inspector from the Petroleum Office called at the Workhouse and informed me it was illegal to obtain petrol without coupons from any trader. He also called with Messrs. Topping and Co. and told him he would hold him liable if he supplied petrol without coupons. I have eight gallons of petrol in stock, and when this amount is exhausted the ambulance will have to be refused for the want of petrol.”

The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) corroborated Mr. Cathcart’s remarks, and said he (the Clerk) told the Petroleum Board representative that ambulances were of more importance than any other vehicles on the road, and that the general public could not possibly be left without ambulances to convey the sick to hospital. He also told the official that they would get petrol for the ambulances whether by surrender of coupons or not. The official promised to explain the matter at his headquarters. Mr. A. Wilson—Did you not ask the Ministry?Mr. J. J. Coalter—Send that letter to the Ministry of Home Affairs and explain the difficulty.  Clerk — The petrol authorities must have got it into their heads we were using it ourselves. Mr. Coalter’s suggestion was unanimously approved of.

CONFIRMATION AT DEVENISH. St. Mary’s Church, Devenish, was thronged on Friday last when the Most Rev. Dr. Farren, Lord Bishop of Derry, administered the Sacrament of Confirmation to upwards of 140 children and some adult converts. His Lordship was met at the church by Rev. E. Coyle, P.P., Devenish, and proceeded through the sacred edifice with a procession of over twenty priests to the High Altar. Mass was celebrated by Rev. P. Monaghan, C.C. Addressing the children after Confirmation, his Lordship congratulated them on being enrolled as soldiers in the army of Christ. Until now they had few responsibilities, but from this hour onwards it would be their duty not only to defend the Kingdom of Christ, but to extend it, and to do this they would have to take an intelligent interest in all that pertains to their faith, and particularly in the liturgy and functions of the Church. It would be easy for them to remain faithful to their religion while they were at home in Catholic Ireland, but if some of them found their way to countries where the faith has grown cold and many people would sneer at their religion, there would be danger for them unless their lives were lived in accordance with the teaching of their faith. They had in the main the Ten Commandments of God to be the general outline of their lives, and they had an informed conscience to tell them what was right and what was wrong. They had a leader, Jesus Christ, and if they were to be enthusiastic about their faith they must always remember the beauty of their Leader, and be ready to sacrifice everything for Him.

During the month of May it is the wish of His Holiness the Pope that all children should pray for his intention, and peace is a necessary preliminary to the restoration of Christian virtue. After administering the Total Abstinence pledge to the children until they attain the age of twenty-one his Lordship said it used to be a mere formality in the past for girls to take the pledge, but times had changed, and there were grave temptations for young girls to take intoxicating drink, particularly in seaside towns during the holiday season. Sponsors were, Mr. Henry McGrath, Devenish; and Mrs. Dick, ex-P.E.T., Cornahilta. His Lordship was much impressed by the splendid new Parochial Hall at Devenish, which competent authorities say is one of the best of its kind in the North.

Confirmation in Cleenish and Derrygonnelly. Administering the Sacrament of Confirmation in St. Mary’s’ Church, Arney, to the children of the three districts of the Cleenish Parish (Arney, Mullaghdun and Belcoo) , Most Rev. Dr. Farren, Lord Bishop of Derry, referred to the death of Dr. McKenna, late Bishop of Clogher, and expressed sympathy with the people of the diocese in their loss. The children confirmed numbered 130, and his Lordship, told them that the Sacrament strengthened their faith.

GREEN CROSS FUND. ENNISKILLEN I.N.F. CEILIDHE FOR GREEN CROSS. The Devenish (Enniskillen) Branch of the Irish National Foresters on Sunday held a most enjoyable and successful ceilidhe in the Foresters’ Hall, Enniskillen, in aid of the Green Cross Fund. (Ed. a fund to support the families of interned Republicans.)

A very large gathering of patrons assembled, drawn mainly from the surrounding districts, but also fairly representative of a much larger area, parties coming from Omagh, Clones and  other parts. To the excellent music of the Enniskillen St. Molaise Band, the dancers enjoyed a very large selection of Irish dances, these being participated in with the utmost pleasure. Never for a moment did the spirit of pleasure flag, and the dancers parted as they had kept happy dancing company, in the best of humour. Mr. Jim Sheridan, Lackaboy, was an efficient master of ceremonies, his dance announcements being made all in Irish. He was assisted by Mr. C. P. Drumm, secretary of Branch Devenish and organiser-in-chief of the ceilidhe. The proceedings concluded with the National Anthem, played by the band and sung by the large assembly, standing at attention.

OTHER SIMILAR FUNCTIONS. Largely contributing to the great improvement in the Ederney parish contribution to the Fund (already acknowledged) was a similar ceilidhe held in Ederney recently. It is to be hoped that other parishes will follow the Enniskillen and Ederney , examples and organise ceilidhthe or football matches in aid of the Fund apart from the ordinary parish collections.

IRVINESTOWN. The Irvinestown district collection of the Irvinestown Parish is complete, but the lodgement is being held over until the Coa and Whitehill areas have also had an opportunity to contribute to the parish total.

ARNEY. A meeting will be held on Sunday evening next, 17th inst., in the vicinity of St. Mary’s Church, Arney, after Devotions, to arrange for this year’s collection in that area. A large attendance is earnestly requested.

KNOCKNINNY. The parish collection is being taken up, and it is hoped that Teemore will also be organised shortly.

KILLESHER. The parish collection in Lower Killesher is well advanced. Nothing has as yet been done in Upper Killesher, but’ an effort is being made to organise that area.

KINAWLEY. The Kinawley collection is practically finished.

DEVENISH. Very Rev. E. Coyle, P.P., Devenish, has forwarded to the County Secretary a cheque for £34 10s 0d, being the 1942 Devenish parish collection for the Fund. The total is an increase of about £5 on last year, and Devenish is to he heartily congratulated on its prompt and generous response to the appeal.

OTHER AREAS. Will other parishes or districts in which no effort has as yet been made please arrange to have the collection taken up as soon as possible. It is desired that the county’s total effort should be concluded within a reasonable time.

EDERNEY’S FINE EFFORT. Ederney Branch of the Green Cross Society has forwarded to Mr P. J. O’Hare, Co. Fermanagh secretary, the sum of £30 2s 8d, result of the 1942 collection in the parish. This amount exceeds by nearly £10 the 1941 total, and Ederney is to be congratulated on its prompt and successful effort. Ederney has been the first parish to complete the 1942 collection. Enniskillen is almost complete, but there are still a few books to come in.

23-5-1942. BELLEEK BREAD CASES. At Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Mrs. Margaret McMahon, Ballynadoghy Belleek, was charged with having, on 22nd November, 1941, without a licence granted by the Board of Trade acquired 16 2 lb. loaves, whereby the total quantity of bread in her possession or under her control, exceeded the normal quantity required by her. The following were similarly charged in  respect to the same date, Mrs. Margaret McCann, Commons, Belleek, for 10 2 lb. loaves; Mrs. Alice Greenan, Commons, Belleek, for 10 2 lb. loaves; Mrs. Annie McGroarty, Fassagh, for 6 2 lb. loaves; Miss Mary Somerville, Fassagh, 7 2 lb. loaves.

Patrick John McCart, Forthill, Irvinestown, was charged with having on November 22nd unlawfully disposed of a quantity of bread to the above mentioned defendants, knowing that by reason of such disposal the quantity of .bread which may be lawfully acquired by these persons would be exceeded. Head Constable Briggs, Belleek, said that on the 22nd. of November, he visited a number of houses in the Commons district. He went to McMahons and found 19 2lb. loaves in a cardboard box. When questioned Mrs. McMahon told him she was giving some of them to friends in the Free State and made a statement to that effect.

The statement was read by Sergeant Blevin. Continuing Head Constable Briggs said that in McCann’s he found six loaves in a coarse bag and four in a handbag hanging from the roof. There were also two other loaves in the house some homemade bread and 9 stone of flour. There were eight people living in the house. In a statement, read by Sergt. Blevin, Mrs. McCann said she got six of the loaves from Hughes bread van. Witness sized ten of the loaves. There were five children in McCann’s as well as the defendant and her husband. The bread van only came round twice a week—on Tuesdays and Saturdays. The house was about 250 yards from the village. Head Const. Brigg’s, continuing, said he went to Greenan’s and found 14 loaves there. There was also some homemade bread and 9 stones of flour. In a statement, read by Sergt. Blevin defendant said she got all the loaves except two from Hughes van.

Sergt. Blevin cross-examined said Mrs. Greenan made no statement concerning her brother-in-law wanting the bread for a dance he was having nor did she mention her sister in hospital. One of the children made some reference to McCabe later. Head Const. Briggs said that in connection with the affair he interviewed McCart, the driver of Hughes bread van, who said he only sold bread for the use of Northern people. He sold one doz.  to McMahons; ½ doz. to McCann’s; 1 doz. to Greenan’s, ½ doz. to Miss Somerville and 5 doz. to Mrs. McGroarty. McCart had one dozen loaves in the van when he was stopped in Garrison. Cross-examined by Mr. Flanagan witness said that when questioned McCart told everything. He had been selling bread in the district for some time.

Constable Green said that on Saturday, November 22, he visited McGroarty’s and saw 9 21b loaves on the table. There were two elderly, and two young people living in the house. Mrs. McGroarty said the loaves were for their own use. Cross-examined witness said the nearest shop was a quarter of a mile away. Mrs. McGroarty would get the same bread there on Monday and Tuesday as she would buy on Saturday. There was flour in the house. Constable Green said he asked Miss Somerville had she any bread in the house and she said she had only two loaves. In a large box he found seven loaves. There were three elderly people in the house. The house was 50 yards from the border. Cross-examined witness said Miss Somerville was an old infirm woman and her brother and the other occupant of the house was much the same.

THE DEFENCE Mr. Flanagan said that his client had been selling bread in the district for some time. He was changed with “knowing” or ‘that he ought reasonably expected to have known, that the amount disposed of was in excess of the quantity to which each person was entitled.” The defendant had no means of knowing how many people lived in each house. His job was to sell bread and like a good businessman he tried to increase his sales. His worship had mentioned, perhaps rightly, that when a poor man was summoned under the Food Order, there were people behind him, but in this case, the firm who employed McCart had nothing whatever to do with it. The defendant had been suspended for a while. He was a young married man with six children.

Capt. Ramage said that Mrs. McMahon had a brother living across the Border, to whom she gave some bread. There was no question of sale. Concerning McCanns there were five, children, two who were working, and the defendant and her husband. There was not an excessive quantity of bread, in the house to last that family from Saturday evening until Tuesday. In McGroartys 9 loaves for four people for three days was not excessive.. All the cases were border line ones.

Mrs. Greenan said she had a brother- in-law John McCabe. At that time her sister Miss Gallagher was in the hospital and, her brother went to see her on that day and the house was locked up. There were three men living in it. On Friday her brother told her to get the bread for him when he was away. Mrs. McCabe was also away seeing her sister and sent a message with witness’s daughter to get some bread as her husband (McCabe) was having a dance on Sunday night, and wanted the bread for the band. She bought six loaves for McCabe, four for her brother and four for herself. Cross-examined, witness said she told the Sergeant about McCabe. There were only seven and a half stones flower in the house. McCart was fined 15/- and 6/7 costs; Mrs. McMahon, 10/6, and Miss Somerville, 10/6. The summonses against the other defendants were dismissed.

HEATH FIRE Peter Maguire, Scribbagh, was fined 8s and 2s costs for displaying a heath fire in an open field. Constable McMullen, Garrison, was complainant.

CAVAN MAN FINED. FOUND WITH CYCLE TYRES AND TEA. CHARGE AT ENNISKILLEN. A young County Cavan man with an address at Lisnaskea—John Stephen J Brady, of Cootehill,—was at a Special court in Enniskillen on Thursday before Major Dickie, R.M., fined £6 4 0d (treble the value of the goods involved) for being on the previous day knowingly concerned in dealing in six cycle tyres and 3lbs, of tea with intent to evade the prohibition of export thereof. Mr. J. Cooper prosecuted, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B, (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) defended. Mr. Cooper said the defendant was met by Constable McKeown with a parcel in which the articles were found.

Constable McKeown said defendant went to Westville Terrace, Enniskillen, watched by witness, knocked at two doors, failing to gain admittance, and then went up the Hospital lane. Witness went up by the railway station and met Brady coming down. Asked what was in the parcel Brady said tyres. Witness put his hand in and found another parcel, which Sergt. Sherrard later at the barracks found to contain the tea. Brady had been working for some time in Fermanagh. A. Dickson, surveyor of Customs and Excise, said Brady made a statement to .him in which he said nothing he had was intended for export. Of the tyres two were intended for a man at Lisnaskea, two for a man at Enniskillen and two for himself. He had got them all in Irvinestown or vicinity, and there also, from a woman whose name he would not give, he had got the tea for his own use.

Mr. Herbert said defendant was married and had five children. He had been working in Fermanagh for some time and had been residing in Lisnaskea. At his work his way of subsistence was to take tea three times daily and this as well as the tea he got in Lisnaskea was more than the two-ounce ration would supply. Therefore he took the chance to get this extra tea for himself. In evidence, Brady bore out this, statement and also swore to the statements made to Mr. Dickson. When apprehended at Enniskillen he told Mr. Cooper he was coming from Irvinestown and going to Lisnaskea. He did not go in by train to Lisnaskea because he had a bus ticket. Constable McKeown, recalled, said at the time it was 9.5 p.m. and Brady was looking for lodgings in Enniskillen. Major Dickie — That rather upsets his story. The magistrate convicted and in addition to imposing the penalty ordered the goods to be forfeited.

23-5-1942. 14½-YEAR-OLD GIRL EARNING 35/ – WEEKLY AS CLERK. A fourteen-and-a-half years old girl is earning 35/- weekly as a clerical assistant in the office of the Clerk of Enniskillen Union. (Mr. J. Brown). Referring to the matter at the Board of Guardians’ meeting on Tuesday, Mr. W. A. Thornton, J. P., expressed this view: “If the wage was three times the amount there would be no question about it. It is too cheap, I think.”

The matter arose through a letter from the Ministry to the Board, in which it was stated that in the absence of full details of the qualifications possessed by Ethel Armstrong—(the child concerned) — and the other candidates for the position of assistant in the clerk’s office, they were not prepared to approve of the appointment to this position of a girl of such tender years and lack of experience, particularly at the comparatively high scale of remuneration proposed. The Ministry asked to be furnished with full particulars of the qualifications experience, etc., of the other candidates whom the Board considered eligible for appointment, and that the Board should forward at the same time the original applications of each. It was stated that the little girl was receiving 35/- weekly. Chairman (Hon. C. L. Corry) —What sort of work is she doing ? The Clerk — It is not very important, She is only 14½. Mr. D. Weir — Does she not do the work as well as an applicant of 20 years of age? Clerk — The Ministry say she is too young. Mr. Weir — It’s a good fault. Mr. Thornton then expressed the view j already quoted. It was decided to ask the Ministry to reconsider their decision and to allow the little girl to stay on.

1942. May. Fermanagh Herald.

9-5-1942. £50 FINE TO STAND. DERRYGONNELLY MERCHANT’S APPEAL DISMISSED. HARBOURING COFFEE, BEANS, RICE. At Enniskillen Quarter. Sessions on Thursday, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., dismissed the appeal of William Barton, merchant, Derrygonnelly, against the conviction, fine of £50, and forfeiture of the goods, for knowingly harbouring 6 cwts. ground coffee; 30 cwts. rice; 7 cwts. American navy (haricot) beans, with intent to evade the prohibition applicable.

Sergeant J. A. Law gave evidence of visiting defendant’s premises arid inspecting his stocks and seizing 7 cwts. of ground coffee, 33 cwts. rice and 10 cwts. American Navy (haricot) beans. Of this quantity the magistrate ordered the forfeiture of the amounts set out in the summons; the balance was to be returned to the appellant.Mr. Barton informed him that he sold 14 lbs. of coffee a week, and at that rate the quantity found would last him for three years. Barton said he sold 4 stone of rice weekly, so that his supply was enough, to do him for 66 weeks.Mr. Cooper—-Do the people in that locality drink coffee at all?Judge—I don’t think the witness knows their tastes for breakfast. Mr. Cooper — You inspected other, shops in the district? Yes. Judge—-Are you showing that appellant had monopoly of the coffee trade and therefore required a large Quantity? (Laughter). Sergt. Law said of the other shops, none had coffee, one had half a ton of rice, and the others two to four cwt. At the time neither, rice nor coffee were rationed. Mr. Cooper— Did you hear a pronouncement by Mr. De Valera as to what haricot beans were used for? Judge—I thought they were used for eating. Mr. Cooper— They are not used for eating. No one who eats them, once is likely to do so again. Mr. Ferguson— Was that why we had so many of them? (Laughter) Mr, Cooper—Did you hear Mr. De Valera’s’ statement? Witness—No. .

The appellant said he was fortunate in having such a small supply when Sergt. Law called. Rice became more popular because cereals were unobtainable at the particular time. In 1938, pre-war, one of his purchases of rice was of a ton in respect of which he produced the invoice. Green peas being off the market since the war, a. substitute was found in haricot beans, which were palatable and good to eat. If a person had his dinner of them he would require nothing else. Witness had always bought peas and beans in large quantities. Coffee was not rationed, and since tea was rationed the sale of coffee had increased considerably. Before the war he had a very big trade in tea as it was a good tea-drinking district— it was a mountainous country, and they knew that meant a good tea-drinking country. When tea was cut down a substitute beverage had to be found and he supplied coffee. Mr. Ferguson (for appellant), — The sergeant says there is a good price for coffee in the Free State?

Witness—I am in informed you cannot give it away to-day in the Free State. Mr. Cooper— Did you hear Mr. De Valera’s pronouncement that beans were to be ground up and mixed with flour? — I never heard it mentioned. Didn’t you tell us at the Petty Sessions that no one ate haricot beans?—No; – you suggested it- and I certainly changed the tune. Mr. Cooper cross-examined the witness as to his large purchases, and Mr. Barton replied, “A man must have some foresight and make some provision for the public if he is to live in business to-day, and right, well you know that. Provided you could not get tea, you would be interested in coffee. Mr. Cooper—I am very interested in coffee. Mr. Barton—You are and I know why, but if you could not get tea and wanted some other beverage, would not you be interested in coffee?—I think you would. Witness said in peace time his stock of rice was two tons. The Judge said he thought the stocks were very large, and that the magistrate’s order was right. He affirmed the conviction.

MAY 9, 1942.R.M. AND BORDER TRIPS. MOTORISTS FINED AT ROSLEA. Strong comments were made by Major Dickie at Roslea Petty Sessions in a case in which Patrick McEntee, Clonfad, Newtownbutler, was fined £3 for driving a car without being properly covered by insurance. A summon for having no driving licence was dismissed. John Hasson, Kilrea, Co. Derry, was fined £3 for permitting McEntee to drive the car without being insured. Mr. J. B. Murphy said Mr. McEntee lived near the Clones Border, His wife was a niece of two old people named McDermott, who were over 80 years.

These people lived 12 miles away and both of them died. . There was no one to look after them. but Mrs. McEntee. Mr. Hasson was a hardware salesman and came to Clones, leaving his car on the Northern side of the Border. He was advised it was dangerous to leave his car there, and went to Mr. McEntee’s house and got permission to leave his car there. Mr. McEntee asked Mr. Hasson to have the car to go to see his wife, and Mr. Hasson agreed. Mr. McEntee, who had a car in “Eire,” went in Mr. Hasson’s car to see his wife, leaving his car on the roadside. Sergt. Williams came along and seized the car as there were some goods in the back of it. Mr. Hasson had lost his car, which was a severe loss. Mr. Hasson lived 16 miles from Coleraine, where he was employed, and had since to cycle to his employment. He was an. entirely innocent party. There would be a Customs prosecution in connection with the goods, found in the car. Hasson, in evidence, stated he had been staying with friends in Clones. He thought McEntee was licensed to drive.

To Dist. Inspector Smyth —He drew a supplementary petrol allowance. Major Dickie — Is that what you travelled to Clones on? Witness—No. Major Dickie—The journey would be about 250 miles. Witness—I had some petrol saved. Major Dickie—-It is time the police looked into these cars at Coleraine and the cars this defendant is associated with. The sooner these 250 miles-per day trips to the Free State are stopped the better. This is a very different thing from a person running out a few miles on a picnic. Mr. Smyth said .he would communicate with the police in Coleraine.

9-5-1942. PRETTY DEVENISH WEDDING. MR. CHIVERS AND MISS MAGUIRE. A pretty wedding was solemnised in St. Mary’s Church, Devenish, on Thursday of last week, the contracting parties being Mr. Thos. Chivers, L.A.C, R. A.F. and Miss Eileen Maguire, youngest daughter of Mrs. Maguire and the late  Mr. Peter Maguire, Devenish. The marriage ceremony was performed by Rev. P. Monaghan, C. C., Devenish. Mr F McGovern, ‘The Hotel” Devenish was best man and the bride was attended by her sister Miss Kathleen Maguire. The bridegroom is a native of Wales and the happy couple are spending their honeymoon in that enchantingly beautiful country. The bridegroom who made a host of friends during his stay in Devenish was recently received into the Catholic Church.

9-5-1942. PROTESTANT APPOINTED WATERWORKS CARETAKER. Enniskillen Rural Council Party Vote. Applications for the position of caretaker of Tempo waterworks (£6 a year salary) were received by Enniskillen R. D. Council on Tuesday, from the following, James Rice, junr., Albert Spratt, Reginald Allen, Robert Woods, John Gilliland, all of Tempo.  Rice, a Catholic, was proposed by Mr, E. Callaghan (N.) 2nd seconded by Mr. T. McLaughlin (N.). Allen, a Protestant, was proposed by Mr, J. Beatty (U.), seconded by Mr. T. Bothwell (U.). On a party vote, Allen was appointed by 5 votes to 2. Mr. Beatty as a later stage in the meeting said £6 a year was useless. Mr. J. Burns— There are six people who like it. Mr. Beatty — Starvation wages! The other day 1 saw in the town four guineas for a pair of boots. You would not run very long in them to the reservoir and to fix bursts till they would be worn out. Mr, Crosier (late caretaker) said it would take £16 to pay him for the work. Mr. A. Elliott—Why is it there are six men in. for it, Mr. Beatty? Have a bit of wit.Mr, Beatty—£6 a year is useless. Chairman (Mr. J. J. Coulter, J.P.) — If this man you voted for does not accept it are you agreeable to the matter being brought up again and giving the job to one of the others? Mr. Beatty—All right I know it is useless. The discussion lapsed.

9-5-1942. DROWNING TRAGEDY. Fate of American Soldier. Ralph R. Helbing (22), a private with the American troops in the Six Counties, was the victim of a drowning tragedy on Tuesday evening. With four companions he was fishing on a raft, when the raft overturned throwing the five into the water. Apparently .the fishing line became entwined around the clothes and legs of the deceased. He was a strong swimmer and he disappeared immediately.

At an inquest on Wednesday morning, Private J. F. Genther said at 7-10 p.m. the previous evening he was standing near the water’s edge when he heard shouting from the direction of the water, and ran down to the edge of the water. He saw four men in the water and one man clinging to a raft. The four men were swimming towards the shore, and witness shouted to men in boats not far away. Two boats arrived and picked up three of the men in the water. He told the rescuers that there was another, but that he must .have gone under. A search was made for the deceased, whose body was recovered after an hour and twenty minutes. Private William Nain also gave similar evidence. Major Fred H. Beaumont said that when the body was recovered at 8.30 he applied artificial respiration, which was continued for two hours. The deceased did not show any sign of life when the body was taken ashore. It was found that the fishing line was entwined, around his clothes and legs. Death was due to drowning. The verdict was recorded of accidental drowning.

9-5-1942. LETTERBREEN HOUSE POSSESSION. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., upheld the appeal of  Mrs. Margaret Maguire of Brockagh, against the dismissal in the lower Court  of her ejectment proceedings against, John Fallon, Cornagee, in respect of a house at Cornagee, let as a weekly tenancy at a rent of 3/6. Mrs. Maguire stated she required the house for occupation by a person engaged in work necessary for the proper working of her farm. The defendant and his wife stated, the first they heard of the notice to quit was after Mrs. Maguire had asked and been refused an increase of rent. A decree for , possession was granted, with 8/- expenses and two guineas costs.

9-5-1942. KESH PETTY SESSIONS. At Kesh Petty Sessions on Tuesday week, before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., Ernest Stewart, Irvinestown, for using an unauthorised motor headlamp was fined £3. Patrick Wm. Molloy, Tullyhommon, was fined £2 in each case for driving a motor car without due care and failing to produce insurance.

George Walshe, Oghill, for riding a bicycle without due care, was fined 1/- and £1 2s costs.

Joseph McAlynn, Doochrock, was fined 1/- and £1 12s and costs for riding a bicycle without due care at Ederney.

John Cunningham, Dullaghan, was fined £4 in a case of eight sheep affected by scab.

Charles Simpson, Edenticrummon, was fined £5 in each case for importing eight head of cattle at Ederney without a licence and giving false information.

9-5-1942. £1,500 TO LEITRIM BOY. Fergus O’Rourke. (16½), Ballinamore, Co., Leitrim, who lost a foot in a shunting accident at Ballinamore railway station last June, was awarded £1,500 damages against, the. G.S.R. Company by a High Court jury,

1942 -Are you a passenger pedaling your own bike? Smuggling.

2-5-1942 ENNISKILLEN GROCER’S SUCCESSFUL APPEAL. Ernest Colvin, grocer, High St., Enniskillen, appealed at Enniskillen Quarter. Sessions on Thursday against a penalty of £50 imposed at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on a charge of knowingly harbouring seven sacks of coffee beans with intent to evade the prohibition of export thereon. Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, said that after Colvin had been convicted they succeeded in arresting a man from the Free State named Keenan, .for whom, this coffee was, and he was fined £50. When the case same on against Keenan they had interviewed Mr. Colvin and his assistant, and got them to come and give evidence against Keenan. In view of this fact the Customs Authorities would agree to this penalty, being reduced to £25. Mr. E. C. Ferguson, D. L. (for Colvin) agreed to this course, and accordingly his Honour affirmed the conviction, but reduced the penalty to £25.

2-5-1942 WHISKEY SEIZURE BY FLORENCECOURT POLICE. Sergeant Ryan and Constable Redpath, Florencecourt, on Saturday evening stopped a car at Drumcarn, Belnaleck, Co. Fermanagh, and on searching it found 6 five naggin bottles of whiskey, four similar bottles of wine and two large bottles of gin, as well as a dozen egg cups, a quantity of tobacco and cigarettes, a showerproof coat and quantity of sweepstake tickets, all of which were seized, together with the car. The driver was taken into custody,, and on. Sunday afternoon was allowed out on £20 bail to appear at next Enniskillen Petty Sessions. Major Dickie, R.M., attended at the Barracks, on Sunday afternoon, and the car driver was ,present with his solicitor, but no court was held, the reason being that the magistrate could not discharge any judicial function on a Sunday, though he can sit as a magistrate. The case could only have been .proceeded with had the man sufficient money to pay any fine which, if he had been convicted, might have been imposed. Had the case been heard and a fine inflicted, the order would have been unenforceable, as the Court was held on Sunday.

2-5-1942 FIRE AT CASTLECOOLE. BUILDINGS DESTROYED. An outbreak of fire occurred on Saturday afternoon in outhouses at Castlecoole, Enniskillen, the residence of the Earl of Belmore. The Enniskillen Town Brigade and the Auxiliary Fire Service, both under Mr. James Donnelly, town surveyor, receiving notification at ten minutes to one, were on the spot before one clock a quick turn-out which probably saved extensive buildings because the fire had gained a firm hold on the solid buildings and was burning fiercely. The efforts of the Brigades were chiefly directed towards confining the outbreak. Until. 2.30 p. m, the battle with the flames continued, ending only when about forty yards of the buildings had been destroyed roof and floors being burned out. The A.F.S. Brigade was under the immediate command of Mr. Freddy Bleakley with Mr. J. Lusted, A.F.S. chief in attendance.

2-5-1942 PARTY VOTE ECHO. FARTAGH COTTAGE TENANCY. An echo of a recent Enniskillen Rural Council party vote on a cottage tenancy was heard at Derrygonnelly Petty Sessions, on Friday, when the Council was granted a decree for possession of a cottage at Fartagh, against Miss Mary Millar. Miss Millar’s father was the tenant until his death a few months ago. Miss Millar applied for the cottage, but it was granted to a Unionist by a party vote of the Rural Council. Miss Millar is a Catholic.

SEIZED BICYCLE AT BELLEEK BARRIER. JUDGE RECOMMENDS RETURN ON PAYMENT OF DUTY. Are bicycles liable to purchase tax? Although, according to Mr, George Dixon, Surveyor of customs and Excise for County Fermanagh the tax is collected throughout Great Britain and the Six Counties on bicycles, Mr. R. A. Herbert, L.B. (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert, Enniskillen contended during the course of an appeal at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Monday, before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., that the wording of the Section of the Act governing the matter makes bicycles not liable.

The appeal was one brought by Terence McGowan, of Ross, Tullyrossmearn, Co. Fermanagh, against an order of Major Dickie, R. M., forfeiting a bicycle under the Customs Acts. When cross-examining Mr. Dixon, the Customs Surveyor, Mr. Herbert referred the witness to the Finance Act No. 2, 1940, which created the Purchase-Tax, and stated that the schedule set out goods that were chargeable with purchase-tax. In the first column (that setting out goods charged at the basic rate of one third were the words: Road Vehicles and Cycles (whether mechanically propelled or not) being vehicles and cycles constructed or adapted solely or mainly for the carriage of passengers.” Mr. Dixon said that was the Section, which gave authority to charge purchase tax on bicycles.Mr. Herbert — Who would be the passenger on a bicycle?—He is his own. passenger. It is being definitely charged and paid all over the United Kingdom. It is time it was questioned.Mr. Herbert said a passenger was already interpreted in law. This boy cycling on this bicycle could not be said to be a passenger. Judge Ellison said he did not think the language in the Section was very neat for the purpose.

Mr. Herbert — It is very far from neat. He further argued that a machine constructed for one person to ride did not make the machine one “constructed for the carriage of passengers.” His Honour held against Mr. Herbert who raised the paint because one of the taxes the appellant was stated to have failed to pay was his purchase tax. Giving evidence for the respondent,  Customs Officer George Forrest, Belleek, stated McGowan was cycling past the barrier there, not stopping, when witness called on him to stop, seeing that he was riding a new bicycle. McGowan in answer to witness’s questions said he belonged to Kiltyclogher, but produced a national registration, card with his address at Ross, Tullyrossmearn. He asked him to account for the fact that he had stated he was from Leitrim, while he was from Ross, and McGowan said he lived at both places off and on, and that he had been, living in the Six Counties for ten years. He said he had borrowed the bicycle from his brother in Kiltyclogher as his own had been stolen. He then offered to pay whatever was necessary. Witness seized the bicycle and an order for forfeiture was granted at the Petty Sessions. “There has not been one single instance,” said witness, “of where a bicycle has been smuggled and has been confirmed as having been smuggled into the Six Counties where the bicycle has not been stated to have been a borrowed bicycle although the bicycle has actually been new at the moment. In cross-examination by Mr. Herbert, witness said cyclists should stop, and go into the Customs hut if necessary. Do you stop all cyclists? —I do if I am on the road. We all pass these huts and see what occurs?—Sometimes it is after five o’clock (when the Customs hut closes).

George Dixon, Customs Surveyor at Enniskillen, stated a Customs duty of 30 per cent, ad valorem was chargeable on Eire-built machines unless satisfactory evidence was produced (a certificate of origin from the manufacturer) that the machine was Empire-made and that the cost of materials and labour involved reached a certain percentage. Mr. Herbert—Could it have been of anything but Empire origin in these days? –Witness stated he admitted the present circumstances, but still the certificate was necessary. Mr. Herbert—Playing with the law like a child, isn’t it?—No, it isn’t. Would you swear this is a foreign article?— I cannot swear it, but it is for the importer to displace the prima facie charge by providing evidence. Were these things drawn to the attention of the importer? —It is the importer’s duty, if he wishes to claim preference, to make a declaration that he claims preference. Don’t you think it would only be fair before putting Customs duty into force that the attention of the importer should be drawn to the provisions? —Undoubtedly, if the citizen had come into the hut and stated he had imported it. Mr. Herbert—A sort of Please, sir, can 1 pass?

Mr, Herbert said McGowan came from Kiltyclogher but had been staying with friends in Ross for some years off and on. This was the smallest thing he had ever come across in the Customs line The same sort of point was raised before where a solicitor in Donegal drove his, car up to the barrier and the Customs seized it as having been imported, but the car was subsequently returned. This boy came along a proper route at a proper time and his bicycle was seized. He had gone a hundred yards or two into Six- County territory. It was straining the law very far to say a certificate of origin was required. Why didn’t they tell him to go back? When he found out the position the boy offered to pay. Mr. Cooper said this was not the only case brought up at the same place. The smuggling of bicycles into the Six Counties was a wholesale business. Mr. Herbert—There is no evidence of that. Judge Ellison said he should be inclined to confirm the order and say he thought this boy should be let off if he paid what he should pay. Mr. Cooper—-We will forward it to the Customs, and they will obey your Honour’s recommendation. Mr. Herbert said Major Dickie had stated that if the brother had appeared to say the bicycle belonged to him he would have given it back. Unfortunately the brother could not appear as he was engaged in munitions work in England. His Honour—I think Major Dickie’s view of that was the right one.

APPEAL AGAINST JAIL SENTENCE. SUCCEEDS AT ENNISKILLEN. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Thursday, before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., James E. Maguire, Cran, Fivemiletown appealed against sentence of three months’ imprisonment imposed at Kesh Petty Sessions in February, when he was charged with the larceny of tools from a camp where he had been employed on work of national importance. Mr. R. H. Herbert, LL.B. for appellant said appellant was a young tarried man, with two young children just school going age. He was a joiner and carpenter and had led an exemplary life.

Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, for the Crown, said that at the time of the prosecution irregularities had been going on in the camp—stealing of goods— and the sentence in this case was very fully justified. It was the least possible sentence the magistrate could put on. Since defendant had been convicted he had given certain information to the camp authorities which enabled them to trace very considerable quantities of other goods and put an end to a very big racket that had been going on. The camp superintendent had asked him (Mr. Cooper) to ask his Honour to deal with the appellant in the same way as another defendant had been dealt with—to fine him the sum of £15. He (Mr. Cooper) would consent to that if his Honour approved of it, but only because of the very valuable information which, appellant gave to the authorities. Sidney E. Sullivan, camp superintendent, told his Honour that appellant had helped him immensely as the result of information given. His Honour affirmed the conviction, but instead of the jail sentence imposed a fine of £15.

2-5-1942 “READ EXCEPTIONALLY WELL” Customs Officer Congratulated at Belleek. When nearly two foolscap pages of closely-written matter—a statement taken down by the witness—had been read in a loud, dear voice by Customs Officer George Forrest, Belleek, at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions, on Monday, Mr. J. B. Murphy, solicitor, congratulated Forrest, remarking: “It is the first, statement I ever heard read out which I was able to hear every syllable. He certainly read it exceptionally well.” Mr. Murphy had given Mr. Forrest a severe cross-examination, but said that, despite that, he must pay Mr. Forrest the above tribute.

 

9-5-1942. JOTTINGS. Accident.— Mr. Joseph Lendrum, Civil Bill Officer, Clones, sustained severe cuts to his face and hands when he was thrown from his bicycle while on official business in Newbliss district.

Nine Typhoid Cases in One Family—In her half yearly report to Enniskillen Rural Council, Dr. Henrietta Armstrong, medical officer, Tempo, stated on Tuesday that nine cases of typhoid had occurred in one family during the period.

Only a Third Tendered For—Although tenders had been invited for the maintenance of twenty-two roads only seven tenders were sent in, it was stated by Mr. J. Brown, clerk, at the quarterly meeting of the Enniskillen Rural District Council on Tuesday.

Train Derailed—Four wagons of the goods train from Clones were derailed at Enniskillen Railway Station on Friday evening, causing suspension of services on the particular line, from shortly after 12 till 11 p.m. Crane and other equipment had to be sent from Dundalk to restore waggons to the rails and clear the line.

Cycle Combination Strikes Bus.—Harry M. Burnside, an American technician, was fined 10/- at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday for having driven a motor cycle without due care and attention. District Inspector Peacocke stated that defendant pulled out of a line of traffic and struck a bus coming in the opposite direction.. The driver of the bus gave evidence that he tried to avoid a collision, but the sidecar of the motor cycle combination struck the bus.

£40 Sought for Mountain Burning— Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday received a preliminary notice of application for £40 compensation for the alleged malicious burning of heather mountain grazing and fences at Killyblunick Glebe, Kilskeery. The claim was forwarded by Messrs. Donnelly and O’Doherty, solrs., Omagh, on behalf of Francis Murphy. Mr. J. Brown, Clerk, thought this place was not in the Enniskillen rural area. Chairman, (Mr. J. J. Coalter, J.P.)— Part of’ the mountain may be. The matter was referred to the Council’s solicitor

9-5-1942. Tractors on Roads.—James Magowan, Innishway, Blaney, was .fined 5/- and 4s costs at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday for driving a motor tractor on the public highway without being licensed for the purpose. He was also fined 5/- and 2/- costs for not having the wheels fitted with smooth-soled tyres. Const. Wilson proved the offence. For a similar offence, John Cox, Ballylucas, was fined 5/-: and costs;. Major Dickie, B.M., expressed the hope that there would be no more of these cases, as the Co. Surveyors were complaining about these things.”

9-5-1942. COMING EVENTS

Tuesday, May 9—-Home Guard Dance, Townhall, .Enniskillen.

Sunday, May 10— Dance MacNean Hall, Belcoo.

Tuesday, May 12—Home Guard Dance, Townhall, Enniskillen.

Whit Monday, May 25—E.U.F.C. Dance Townhall, Enniskillen.

9-5-1942. NEW CEMETERY FOR CATHOLICS. The present Catholic Cemetery in Enniskillen being now almost entirely used, Ven. Archdeacon Gannon, P.P., V.G., announced at the Masses in St. Michael’s Church, on Sunday, that use will be made in future of the public cemetery at the Tempo road, near the town. In the Protestant part of this burying ground, there are hundreds of graves, but not more than a dozen interments have taken place in the portion reserved for Catholics.

9-5-1942. BROUGHT EGGS FROM CO., MONAGHAN. EMYVALE MAN FINED AT ROSLEA. At Roslea Court, before Major Dickie, R.M. John McCrudden, Golan, Emyvale, Co. Monaghan, was charged with illegally importing 60 doz. eggs from County Monaghan. Mr. Cooper said defendant was caught, bringing over 60 doz. eggs on a bicycle into the Six-County area. Mr. J. B. Murphy (for defendant) said his client was the son of a six-acre farmer in Co. Monaghan, and was cycling across with the eggs. He wanted to point out the sons of small farmers in “Eire” had nothing like the money they had in the Six Counties at the present time. Defendant was fined £5 11s, equal to the single value of the duty.

9-5-1942. EDERNEY P.P. INJURED. On Friday evening at Manoo, Cross between Kesh and Irvinestown, Co., Fermanagh, a collision took place       between a motor-car driven by Rev. P. McCarney, P.P., Ederney, and a military vehicle. Father McCarney, who was coming from Irvinestown direction, was seriously injured and his car completely wrecked. He was removed to Fermanagh County Hospital, Enniskillen.

9-5-1942. THROWN FROM CART. BELTURBET MAN’S TRAGIC DEATH. Dr. J. Stuart, coroner, held an enquiry in Cavan Surgical Hospital into the death of Jas. McManus (68) farmer and shop keeper, Drumgart, Belturbet at the institution as the result of falling from a cart. The evidence was that when drawing manure in a cart the pony bolted and the deceased was thrown out of the cart. Dr McInerney, house surgeon, stated that the man died from respiratory failure due to spinal injuries. A verdict in accordance with testimony was returned.

CIVIL DEFENSE EXERCISE IN ENNISKILLEN. The Wardens, Casualty and Rescue Services of the A.R.P. organisation in Enniskillen took part in an outdoor combined exercise on Tuesday night. Casualties and incidents were staged in various parts of the town and were expeditiously dealt with by the various services concerned. Work generally was well done, services quickly on the spot, and in general the leaders of parties and instructors have every reason to congratulate themselves on the degree of efficiency attained. More drill and more practices are needed to reach the required standard, but it is obvious from this practice that the groundwork has been well done.

The Report Centre exercised efficient control and showed that they had complete knowledge of the different business of co-ordination and control. The exercise showed very plainly the need for a really efficient messenger service. Telephonic communications for short distance calls during hostile air activity may be regarded as, if not impossible, at least much too slow. More messengers are required, especially those with bicycles. Special uniform and equipment are provided free to cyclist despatch riders. The umpires who supervised the practice were:—Casualty Services, Dr. W. A. Dickson; Wardens and Rescue Parties, Major J. A. Henderson, A.R.P.O.; Report Centre, Mr. J. W. Lusted; Transport, Mr. J. W. Maxwell; Director of Practice, Capt. W. R. Shutt, M.C., County Civil Defence Officer.

MAY 9, 1942. The Regal Cinema, Friday, May 8 and Saturday—

BING CROSBY, BOB HOPE DOROTHY LAMOUR.

THE ROAD TO ZANZIBAR

Monday, May 11 and Tuesday— VIRGINIA BRUCE, JOHN

BARRYMORE. THE INVISIBLE WOMAN

Also Dennis O’Keefe, Constance Moore in

I’M NOBODY’S SWEETHEART NOW

Wednesday, May 13 Thursday— MIRIAM HOPKINS CLAUDE RAINS

LADY WITH RED HAIR

Also William Lundigan, Eddie Foy, Jr, THE CASE OF THE BLACK PARROT.

9-5-1942. INSURANCE FOR SMUGGLERS. Comments on Fermanagh Solicitor’s Statement. Commenting on a statement made by Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor for Fermanagh, in a smuggling prosecution in Newtownbutler that in Co., Monaghan people could take out policies of insurance against capture whilst smuggling, a writer in the “ British Journal of Commerce,” the leading shipping paper, says: “ By inference, the Crown Solicitor appears to have considered these insurances to be reprehensible, but if they are, then such reprehensible practices are countenanced by the very law which, the Grown Solicitor was employing in his prosecution, the law of England, which, presumably, runs in Northern. Ireland save in so far as there is special legislation for that part of the United Kingdom..

“It was in 1779 that Lord Mansfield, to whom, we owe so much of our marine insurance law, held that it was not illegal to effect an insurance on a smuggling adventure into a foreign country. It was in the case of Planche v. Fletcher, and his very words were ‘At any rate this was no fraud in this country. One nation does not take any notice of the revenue, laws of another.’

“If, however, any would-be smuggler is thinking of effecting a policy, on a cargo of contraband, presuming he can obtain the necessary export licence, he should take care to inform his under-writers of the nature of the adventure, for while it may be legal to insure a smuggling venture, to fail to inform the insurers of its nature would, surely invalidate the policy by reason of concealment of material fact.”

9-5-1942. ENNISKILLEN VANDALISM CONDITION OF TOWN HALL. “For some reason there has been a determined attempt to wreck everything in the Town Hall and public lavatories,’’ said the Borough Surveyor (“Mr. T. Donnelly) at Enniskillen Urban Council on Monday. “There seems to be a systematic wave of destruction for the past, six or nine months,’ he added. These remarks arose out of a report upon a series of malicious damages to public conveniences and lavatories in the town; also electric light fittings and clothes racks in the Town Hall. “In all cases the damage appears to have been wilful, and carried out with the object only of destroying property. During the past months the entire water supply fittings to the urinals in the Town Hall lavatories have been broken away from their positions, and left lying on the floor, although they were properly secured to the walls, the chromium-plated stand to a wash-basin was smashed, and part of it taken away, etc.” Chairman (Senator Whaley)—This damage has not been done by children—it has been done by adults.

Mr. Devine said this was all due to lack of supervision. Mr. W: S. Johnston disagreed Damage would not be done while their caretaker was about, and he could not stand all day in the lavatories. Mr. Johnston then told how he and their Surveyor tried some of the fittings and could not budge them. “It would take a superman to pull off some of the fittings-it must have taken terrific strength,” he commented.

9-5-1942. WANT TURF PRICES FIXED. ENNISKILLEN COUNCIL REQUEST. Enniskillen Urban Council is to communicate with the Ministry of Commerce with a view to having the price of turf fixed. The matter was raised by Mr. W. Monaghan, at the Council meeting on Monday, when, he said fuel was a problem. In the interests of the poor, the Council, should take up with the authorities the question of regulating the supply and price of turf. He understood exorbitant prices were being given for stacks .of turf by people who were in a position to give high prices, and this might; react against the poor during: the coming winter. Some regulation of supply and price was made during the last war.         Mr. Devine said it was a very important matter. Turf prices should be controlled. The Chairman (Senator Whaley) said he believed it was during the coal strike that there was a collection in the district to supply turf to the poor of .the town at reduced prices. The Council agreed to write to the Ministry asking for the advice of the Ministry on the whole  position and to establish fixed prices for turf and regulate the supply.