1942 June.

£550 SOUGHT FOR MOUNTAIN BURNING. Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, referred to its solicitor a preliminary notice of application for compensation on behalf of the Earl of Enniskillen for £550 for the burning of 1,500 acres of mountain lands with the heather, grass, game and game cover on the lands of Aghatirourke.

CARETAKER’S APPLICATION. Application for an increase in salary was made by Mr. James H. Kerr, cemetery caretaker, to the Enniskillen Rural District Council on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., presiding. Mr. Kerr said he had been nineteen years in the Council’s service and had only received one small increase in salary, six years ago. He had not taken any holidays since his appointment. The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) said Mr. Kerr’s salary was £63 a year (inclusive of £13 bonus) with free house, coal and light, and 3/- for each grave. The Ministry would not, in his (the clerk’s) opinion grant an increase of salary in accordance with wartime regulations. It was decided to consider the application at the next meeting in July.

20-6-1942. SCOTSTOWN POTEEN CHARGE. At Monaghan District Court., before Mr. P. Lavery, D.J. at the suit of Supt. Ryan, Bernard McElmeel, Glan, Scotstown, was fined £6 for having a half-pint of illicit spirits, in his possession, Guard Hegarty stating that defendant, who was without a light on a bicycle, accelerated his speed when he met witness, who subsequently found a bottle containing poteen on the road. Defendant denied it was his. Mr. McWilliams, solr., for McElmeel, admitted ownership, and said his client lived with his father, aged 74 and there was no one else to look after the crop.

20-6-1942. £5 10s WEEKLY FOR MAN, HORSE, CART. COUNCIL OBJECTIONS. Horses and carts are almost unobtainable for daily hire in the Enniskillen district, being regularly employed on constant work, Mr, J. Donnelly, Surveyor, had reported to the Town improvement Committee: “Owing to the almost continuous employment of the Council’s lorry on the collection of waste paper and scrap iron, he found it necessary to hire a horse with cart and harness for street maintenance and other works. The horse, cart and harness was supplied by Mr. H. Sadlier, carting contractor to the Council. The driver was supplied by the Council.”

The committee recommended that Mr. Sadlier be paid a rate of 10/- per day. Mr. T. Algeo, after the reading of the foregoing report asked what was the rate of pay of the man regularly employed with, horse and cart by the Council. Mr. Donnelly said £3 10s weekly. Mr. Algeo said this thing should have been advertised, and they would have got a lot of people to do it more cheaply. One man was getting £3 10s for himself, his horse and cart; while for another they were, paying £5 10s for the horse and cart and man. Mr. Donnelly said the rate was fixed by the committee. The work had been increasing to such an extent that the lorry could no longer do it. Previously he had employed Francis Cleary at 15/- daily, but he had refused to do it this time at less than 25/- daily, at which, rate he said he was, paid elsewhere. He (Mr. Donnelly) tried everywhere to get another horse and cart, but could not do so. Mr Sadlier bought, a horse to provide it with a cart for the Council. The rate was 19/- weekly approximately. Mr. G. Elliott said there was no hope of getting it done cheaper. The matter was approved, Mr, Algeo dissenting.

20-6-1942. CAVAN FARMERS HIT BY SHORTAGE OF LABOUR. The shortage of labour on Cavan farms was referred to by members at a meeting of Cavan Agricultural Committee. Mr. Dolan said that farmers worked 16 hours a day tilling the land and they could not get the crop in. The secretary thought it would be doubly difficult getting it out. Mr. Taite — A lot of young people are going away to better themselves and it is hard to blame them. Senator Baxter said the number of men on the land was not sufficient to save the harvest. It was suggested that shopkeepers in towns should close for a few days weekly and allow off the assistants—-mostly farmers’ sons—to help on the land.

The secretary said voluntary organisation of some kind was needed. Senator Baxter suggested that if the urban dwellers realised the. grave risk to the, harvest they would willingly cooperate. At a meeting of Co. Monaghan Agricultural Committee reference was made to the glut of potatoes. Mr. McGahey said anything would be better than to see the potatoes rotting in the pits. Mr. Pollock said with the present glut it might be possible under a trade pact with Britain to exchange the potatoes for coal. Mr. McEntee said a stone of oatmeal could not be got in Monaghan.

20-6-1942. RHUBARB WANTED. ANY QUANTITY. HIGHEST PRICES PAID —AT- GRACEY’S The BROOK, ENNISKILLEN.

20-6-1942. ACCIDENT TO ENNISKILLEN STEAM ROLLER. The steam roller of Enniskillen Urban Council, while working (on hire) at an avenue in Lord Enniskillen’s demesne, Florencecourt, sunk on the side of the avenue and partly overturned. It took three, days’ efforts to get it out again. The roller was thus out of commission from 26th May till 2nd June. It had been on hire for three weeks at the time of the accident. Since then a number of badly worn tubes had to be replaced, Mr. Donnelly, Surveyor, told Enniskillen U.D.C.

20-6-1942. YOUNGSTERS BEGGING FROM U.S. TROOPS. REFERENCE AT URBAN COUNCIL. Mr. W. E. Johnston drew attention to the conduct of youngsters in Enniskillen begging from American soldiers. “It is an absolute disgrace the way the children are running, after these soldiers, stopping them, and begging at every corner,” he said. These soldiers were very kind, and when they came gave money to these kiddies, and now the soldiers were being absolutely annoyed. . Something should be done. This habit was not confined to Enniskillen, for he read of it happening elsewhere—in Belfast, Bangor, etc. It was not good to see this going on. It did not show Enniskillen up very well. It was decided to draw the attention of the police to the matter.

13-6-1942. NEW CAVAN CATHEDRAL FORMALLY OPENED BY BISHOP OF KILMORE. HIS LORDSHIP RECALLS THE DAYS OF PERSECUTION. The new Cathedral in Cavan was, on Sunday, formally opened for public worship by Most Rev. Dr. Lyons, Bishop of Kilmore. Three hundred years ago, Bishop Hugh O’Reilly, of Kilmore, suffered insult and. imprisonment for his faith. It was he who originated the Catholic Confederacy and fought against bitterness, treachery, and the persecution of his flock. It was fitting that his successor should use his chalice in the celebration of the first public Mass in the new edifice. “A symbol of victory” was the description applied by Most Rev. Dr. Lyons to his beautiful Cathedral, when, he addressed the vast congregation at the opening ceremony.

The building of a cathedral at any time” he said, “is proof of a vigorous religious life in a diocese. This Cathedral is much more it is the sign of our religious resurgence. “It links us across three centuries with the days of the great Hugh O’Reilly, Bishop of Kilmore, whose Chalice, well over 300 years old, is in use in the holy Mass to-day.’ “This Cathedral of Saints Patrick and Felim is an eloquent and noble act of thanksgiving to the Omnipotent God, who, over centuries has with, the outstretched arm of His Providence preserved our people in their ancient faith.”

BUILDING OF CATHEDRAL. Under the untiring zeal and efforts of Most Rev. Dr. Lyons, the splendid Cathedral has been almost completed in three years. The building fund was inaugurated in 1919 by the late Most Rev. Dr. Finnegan., and the foundation stone was laid in September, 1939. Next September the dedication ceremony will take place, marking the completion of the work. The Cathedral stands beside the old one, which will be taken down, stone by stone, to be re-erected in Ballyhaise, thus preserving a link with the glorious past of this historic diocese.

20-6-1942. JOTTINGS. Warships Collection.—Total to date in Fermanagh is £310,620, of which Enniskillen contributed £106,153, Irvinestown £46,534, and Lisnaskea £43,757.

Prisoner of War—included in the latest list of British prisoners of war in Italian hands is Pte. James Steward Bercin, Letter P.O. Fermanagh.

Monaghan postmaster for Mullingar—Mr. John Cassin, postmaster, Monaghan, has been transferred on promotion to be postmaster of Mullingar.

Monea Man’s Death—Word has been received that Pte. Edward Scott, son of Mr. Robert Scott, Means, Monea, County Fermanagh, has died in a prisoner of war camp in Italy.

W.V.S. Savings Effort. — W.V.S. Savings Groups for Fermanagh Warship Week provided the following totals: Enniskillen, £2,892 2s 8d; Enniskillen Rural, £7.753 14s Id; Lisnaskea Rural, £8,250 4s 6d.

A. F. Man missing—Flight-Sergeant Ronnie West, son of Mr. and Mrs. John West, Trory, Ballinamallard, Co. Fermanagh, has been reported missing following one of the bomber raids on Germany.

Kilskeery Aeridheacht.—The winner of the. solo singing (Anglo-Irish, under 14) at Kilskeery aeridheacht recently was Miss Nuala Drumm, Convent of Mercy, Enniskillen, not Nuala Quinn, as already stated.

Food and Drugs officers—Fermanagh County Council on Friday appointed Sergeant William O’Donnell, Belcoo, to be Food and Drugs Inspector for the Letterbreen Petty Sessions district, and Sergeant J. D. Cochrane for the Belleek Petty Sessions district.

Sympathy-Fermanagh Co., Council on Friday, on the proposal of Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., seconded by Mr. J. W. Creighton, J.P., passed a resolution of sympathy with Mr. H. A. Burke, LL.B., Under-Sheriff, on the death of his father, Mr. H. A. Burke, D.L.

Fermanagh County council Officers—Sir Basil Brooke, M.P., was on Friday re-elected chairman of Fermanagh County Council, at the annual meeting pf that body. The re-election of the chairman was passed unanimously on the motion of Mr. A. Wilson, seconded by Mr. T. M. Noble. Hon. Cecil Lowry-Corry, J.P., was unanimously re-elected vice-chairman on the motion of Mr. G. Elliott, seconded by Mr. J. W. Creighton, J.P.

Rat Instead of Fish. While fishing for pike in the River Finn, near Rosslea, Mr. Joseph Montgomery, principal teacher, Rosslea P.E. School, had a remarkable experience. Mr. Montgomery was using a minnow and having felt a tug on his line, he proceeded to haul it in. To his amazement he landed, not a fish, but a large rat which was firmly hooked on the minnow.

20-6-1942. SONS OF ENNISKILLEN MAN GET DISTINCTIONS IN BRITISH COLONIAL SERVICE. Six sons, all of whom occupy or have retired from positions in the Colonial service—this is the record of the family of Mr. C. Bartley, retired inspector of schools. Fairview, Enniskillen, a native of County Monaghan whose eldest son, Charles, has just retired from a Judgeship of the High Court, Calcutta, and has been awarded a Knighthood. Sir Charles Bartley’s eldest son, recently awarded the. D.F.C. is now a squadron leader in the R.A.F.

Mr. Bartley’s other five sons are William, recently retired from the Colonial Civil Service, and who has just been awarded Companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. George (C.M.G.) and Member of the Order of the British. Empire (M.B.E.). John, who is additional Secretary to the Government of India and who has been awarded Companion of the Order of the Star of India (C.S.I.) and Companion of the Order of the Indian Empire (C.I.E.); Frederick, who has retired from the Indian Police, and who was awarded Commander of the Order of the British. Empire (C.B.E.) and also the King’s Police Medal with Bar; Douglas, who is Judge of the Supreme Court in Kenya and Gwyther, who is Deputy Inspector General of the police force in Assam, and who has been awarded the King’s Police Medal. Sir Charles and Jack are scholars of Trinity College both being senior moderators in classics and modern literature.

20-6-1942. ENNISKILLEN WOMAN FINED. Unlawful possession of army property was alleged against Mrs. Sidney Thompson, 5, Mary St., Enniskillen, who, at the local Petty Sessions on Monday, was charged with haying ten blankets, two paillasses and one pillow-slip, the property of the Army Council.

D.I. Peacocke prosecuted, and said defendant was the wife of a serving soldier. He alleged, she made a statement saving that eight of the blankets were the property of her husband’s grandmother, and the other two she bought in Brookeboro’. She added that her husband brought the other articles to the house. Head Constable Thornton gave evidence of searching defendant’s house and finding the property.. She made the statement read by the D.I. Sergeant Bailey, of the Special Investigation Branch of the Corps of Military Police, testified to accompanying the last witness when the search was made. All the blankets (produced) were W.D. property, and he was satisfied four of them were manufactured certainly not before 1940. One of the others might have been rejected by the Army. Ink stains on it made it appear as if it had been used on an office table and it was quite possible defendant’s husband might have come by it lawfully.

Miss A, Barrett, shopkeeper, Brookeborough, who had sold discarded Army blankets in her shop, did not think any of the blankets shown her had ever passed through her shop, and she did not recollect ever selling the defendant any. Asked by Major Dickie, P.M., if she wished to give evidence, defendant replied in the negative. His Worship said he must hold the charge proved. He observed that if the blankets had been new he would have taken a serious view of the case. He fined defendant 40/- and 6/8 costs, ordering that the property be returned to the military authorities.

20-6-1942. FOUR MONTHS JAIL SENTENCE ON NEWTOWNBUTLER MAN. Second Fined £50. R.M.—”DELIBERATE SMUGGLING” “I am tired giving those warnings and nobody seems to bother about them,” declared Major; Dickie, R.M., when recalling that, at previous Courts he had announced that stiff terms of imprisonment were in store for those caught smuggling. He was speaking at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, when Philip Swift of Lisnashillinda, was summoned for being knowingly concerned in removing 12 stone of flour and 14 cwt. sulphate of ammonia with intent to evade the prohibition of export. James Johnston, Kiltober was summonsed for being knowingly concerned in harbouring 14 cwts. sulphate of ammonia, 1 cwt 2 qrs. flour, 1 qr. custard powder, 14 lbs. pepper, 48 parcels of Bisto and 4 lbs. toilet soap, with intent to evade the prohibition. Mr. J. P. Black, solr., tendered a plea of guilty on behalf of Swift.

In the ease against Johnston, Sergeant Green said that on Sunday, 3th February he saw Swift outside a cafe in Newtownbutler. Later three military trucks drew up and Swift followed the soldiers inside. Later Swift left the town on his bicycle and one of the trucks followed him. The police followed both and discovered the truck at Johnston’s house, just on the border. They also saw Swift running away. In the byre they found the sulphate of ammonia and flour and the other articles (listed in the summons), in the dwelling house. They also seized four gross of clothes pegs for which Johnston was separately summonsed. Johnston told witness he got the pegs in Cavan.

Cross-examined by Mr. J. B. Murphy, witness said he was satisfied Johnston was not present when the stuff was delivered and it had been removed by the police before he reached home again. Constable Duffy also gave evidence. Robert Clarke, a serving soldier, grave evidence that Swift requested him, as a favour to deliver some sacks and witness agreed. They left the bags at a farm on the Clones road; seven bags of sulphate of ammonia and two bags of flour. Johnston, in evidence, said he had been away after Mass on Sunday morning till 3 a.m. on Monday, seeing an uncle at Smithboro’ and knew nothing about the transaction till he was informed by the servant girl. Cross-examined by Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, defendant admitted Swift had spoken to him on the previous Friday about the proposed smuggling, but he Johnston, declined to have anything to do with it.

Mr, Murphy submitted that there was no evidence to show Johnston knew anything about the smuggling on that particular date. His Worship said defendant lived on the border and all the commodities in question had been found in this premises and yet Mr. Murphy was suggesting, there was no evidence against him. Anybody with intelligence should see that he was bringing the stuff to Johnston’s house had no sympathy with him. Mr. Black said his client admitted bringing the stuff to Johnston’s house but that Johnston did not know anything about it. His Worship said he had often stated

27-6-1942. CYCLIST’S FATAL INJURIES. KILLADEAS WOMANS FATE. Miss Catherine Breen, Drogan, Killadeas (73), single, who was seriously injured when as she was cycling near Riversdale, Ballinamallard, she was in collision with a private motor car, died in Fermanagh County Hospital on Monday evening. At an inquest in Fermanagh County Hospital an Tuesday, by Coroner George Warren and a jury, a verdict was returned of accidental death, no blame being attached to the driver. The driver, Ernest Stewart, cinema manager Lisnarick Rd., Irvinestown, driver of the car, stated he was driving from Enniskillen to Irvinestown, about 4 p.m. on Sunday at 30 mph. As he approached Riversdale Avenue he blew his horn. The cyclist came out of the Avenue straight in front of the car. He swerved to the right to avoid her but she went in front of the car and the left front headlamp hit her. He did everything in his power to avoid the collision.

Charles G. Thompson, V.S., Strabane, who was sitting beside the driver of the car, Thomas Aiken, Irvinestown, and Henry Crowhurst, Henry St., Enniskillen who were in the back of the car, gave similar evidence, stating the cyclist came out so quickly she could not be avoided. Evidence of identification was given by W. J. Breen, deceased’s brother, and Constable Bothwell produced a sketch, of the road and gave measurements.

27-6-1942. MARRIED TEACHERS NOT TO RESIGN. Fermanagh Education Committee heard from the Secretary (Mr, J. J. Maguire) that the junior assistant mistress appointed to Clonelly School at the last meeting had not taken the position. He wondered if the Committee would rescind the resolution on the books providing that a female teacher must resign three months after marriage. It was very difficult to get teachers. Capt. Wray —I see they are doing that in England. Secretary — It is an emergency provision for the duration of the war only. Dean MacManaway intimated he would hand in notice to have the resolution rescinded.

27-6-1942. YOUNG AMERICAN STUDENT’S SUCCESS. GRANDSON OF ENNISKILLEN MAN. The New York papers recently carried the news of the success of Mr. Joseph J. Martin in the annual elocution contest among students, of Fordham Preparatory School, high school division of Fordham University. Master Martin is a son of the Hon. Joseph P. Martin, assistant United States District Attorney, and grandson of Mr. Joseph Martin, Derrychara, Enniskillen (a native of Derrylin), retired official of the U.S. Postal Department. An uncle of the successful student is Mr. Jack Martin, B.A., N.T., Virginia, Co. Cavan. Master Martin is the holder of many awards as an orator, elocutionist, debater and thespian and he received a gold medal for his rendition of “The Burgomaster’s Death.” Assistant District Attorney Joe Martin is now attached to the United States armed forces.

27-6-1942. MEN WHO KEEP SONS AT HOME. Disabled Ex-Soldier’s Daughter’s Relief Claim. The daughter of a now disabled soldier who fought in the Great War and the South African War was refused outdoor relief by Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday.

The girl, aged 29, looks after her father, but is registered as able and willing to work at the local Labour Exchange. After receiving relief of 5/- weekly for five years, she was offered and accepted work at the Enniskillen Workhouse, where she was engaged at the job for a few weeks. Relieving Officer Cathcart said when the girl started to work he removed her from the relief list, and now that the work finished he brought her ease forward to consider the resumption of the weekly relief. Mr, J, Burns said there was a dearth of domestic servants. Was this girl willing to work? R.O. Cathcart — She is registered for work at the Exchange. Mr. A. Wilson — When she is registered for work it makes it legal for you to give her relief. Mr. W. A. Thornton — You are not hound to.

Mr. McKeown — Her father has served in two wars. Some of those people who are talking have big sons and they won’t send them out to keep up the Empire. This man fought in two wars and in his old age his daughter is watching him and is willing to go out to work when she can get it. Some of the people here won’t send their own sons out to fight for the Empire. Mr. Stewart proposed that relief be not granted to the girl, and Mr. J. Burns seconded. Mr. C. McKeown proposed that relief be restored, and Mr. D. Weir seconded.

For Mr. C. McKeown’s motion there voted: Lord Belmore, Messrs. Weir, Humphreys,  Clarke and McKeown—(5). For Mr. Stewart’s proposal a number of members—all Unionists—voted, and the Chairman (Mr. J. J. Coalter) said that this motion was passed.

THE PAST RECALLED. RECOLLECTIONS OF PETTIGO DISTRICT. In an recent issue of the ‘‘Fermanagh Herald” there was news of my native village school which not only filled me with pride, but helped me to recall some of the happiest memories of my boyhood days, together with many little episodes as a pupil following the opening stages of that school. At a recent concert in Aughnahoo school, that grand old song—“Come to the hedgerows,” was sung by the children —a song which was taught to hundreds of children in the same school by its first Master—Mr. J. T. Lawton, M.A., 56 years ago, and who went to live in Wabana, Newfoundland, after his early retirement.

The reading of the concert report thrilled me as I am sure it thrilled other readers who had the good fortune to study under Mr. Lawton at Aughnahoo. He was a brilliant teacher capable at the time of teaching most subjects now taught only in Colleges and Universities. I wonder how many of my school-mates living to-day recall the happy times experienced during that period, when we used to scurry along the narrow road (now covered with grass) to the shores of Lough Erne during our periods of recreation and indulge in all sorts of fun and frolic. Well I remember how when going to school with turf under our arms and school fees in our pockets we skated and slid on the ice-covered pond at Letter quarry—a place that received the attention of our Master on more than one occasion as it tended sometimes to keep us late from reaching the school.

The concerts organised by the same Master in the school would compare very favourably with the best of our modern concerts, and the excellent performances of the pupils in the production of many sketches which were special features of the programmes, coupled with the magic lantern displays and talks given by the Master himself could not be excelled. He organised these entertainments at his own expense, gave numerous prized and made special presentations to those of us who worked as pupils to secure distinctions.

At those; concerts the school room was thronged, the parents of the children travelling miles at night over country-side and mountain paths, carrying hurricane lamps and lanterns to witness an entertainment that left them spellbound. I could go on writing ad lib., on the humour and beauty of those concerts and particularly on the superb qualities of our old Master.

Aughnahoo school—what memories that old building brings to me! To-day or at least when last I saw its walls bore traces of the bullets of the “Tans” during the siege of Pettigo. The school has been the Alma Mater of many who have attained distinction in the professional and commercial spheres. The school lies in the heart of a most beautiful countryside. It is situated almost on the shores of Lough Erne-that great expanse of water with its sandy beaches and numerous wooded, islands. The Glebe, with its ancient Manse and acres of lawn, adorned with huge trees of sycamore shape and the grey ruins of Castle Termon Magrath tower high over the undergrowth. These are distinctive marks in the landscape. Then .there are the hills of Drumheriff, with their beautiful slopes of green pasture and silvery streams and the meadows, beneath where many of us used to gather the seasonable flowers on our way from school and fill the vases which adorned the mantel pieces in our homes.

Yet we did not in those far-off days appreciate all the natural gifts and beauties of our homeland. As in the case of myself later generations of pupils no doubt carry treasured memories of their time in Aughnahoo school. The exiled Irish and particularly those from rural Ireland all carry pleasant recollections of their carefree days at school and their innocent forms of enjoyment. Modern life unfortunately is devoid of the happy features of everyday life prevalent when myself and my comrades went to that dear old school. I am glad, however, that in many respects those features of modernity have not seriously permeated the life of my native district.

In those good old days to which I refer on Sundays and holydays the Waterfoot, in so far as assemblages were concerned, was a centre somewhat similar to the Bundoran of the present day. Fathers and mothers with their children and crowds of young people could be seen trekking along from the village to spend the afternoon along the sandy shores of Lough Erne, and large numbers basked in the Sun near the old walls or ruins of Castle Termon Magrath. In fact the Waterfoot was a household word in those  days, but I .regret to say that on my last visit some three years ago and on a Sunday afternoon I did not see one person there. Of course times have changed and the people in some respects have also changed. Wake up Pettigo let us see a rebirth of the old ideas and old customs!

Patrick McCaffrey, 3 McNeill Ave., Prestwick, Ayrshire.

27-6-1942. SCHOOLS MEALS SCHEME FOR FERMANAGH. In a letter to Fermanagh Regional Education Committee, on Friday, the Ministry wrote regarding the committee’s decision to inaugurate a scheme for mid-day meals for children, in attendance at public elementary schools, under which children deemed necessitous would receive free meals, and non-necessitous would be required to meet the cost of the food.

The Ministry noted that the standard of necessity had been fixed at 5/6 weekly per head in the rural areas, and 6/- in the urban area. As regards the proposal that the cost of each meal should not exceed 2d, the Ministry was of the opinion that it would not be desirable to limit the cost to that amount, as it was doubtful if a suitable meal could be provided at that price. The Ministry suggested that one of its officers and an inspector should attend a committee meeting for consultation. Mr. Coffey said 2d was the sum left down as the cost of a meal for farm labourers, and surely, therefore it should suffice for children.

The Secretary (Mr. J. J. Maguire) said he had been in touch with practically all the teachers in the county, and one thing all teachers pointed out, was lack of cooking facilities either in the school or near hand. This, they thought, would prevent them from giving anything to children except cocoa, milk, bread, butter, or jam, or any, of those things. There were very few necessitous children. In many cases the teachers put this to the parents, who had said they would prefer to continue to provide the food for the children as at present, rather than pay for a meal.

Mr. G. Elliott— Has this committee approved of putting a scheme into operation? Secretary— They have. Mr. G. Elliott— I think it is a mistake.

Capt. Wray said the resolution was on the books. The 2d as an estimated cost was suggested by the Finance Committee, who thought that perhaps it might cover milk. It was very difficult to put an estimate on it. The Committee’s resolution in March was that it should be left to each individual school to determine the type of meal they thought best suited to their pupils. If 2d did not cover it the committee could make it 2½d. They would be able to judge better when they had practical experience of the working of the scheme.

The Secretary said that matter was put to the teachers, and 97 per cent of the replies he got were in favour of cocoa, milk, or something of that nature, with bread and butter if obtainable, or margarine; cold milk in summer and hot in winter. A lot of schools had schemes running at present. The majority of schools seemed to have some scheme of hot meals for children in winter, and it seemed parents provided their own supplies of cocoa and milk, and had it prepared in school during play hours by the teachers. Parents who could afford the price of milk would prefer to continue to supply their own cocoa and milk rather than pay for the milk in the school.

Capt. Wray asked did the Ministry say the Committee must fix a higher price, or merely suggest it was insufficient? The Secretary said the Ministry thought it would be insufficient. Mr. Elliott asked must they go on with the scheme. The Secretary said there was nothing compulsory about it. Mr, McKeown said the teachers were very sympathetic; the difficulty was securing a place near hand.

27-6-1942. TEMPO VICTUALLER SUMMONED. FALSE REPRESENTATIONS CHARGE. At Lisbellaw Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Hugh Tunney victualler, Tempo., was charged with having, on 21st March last, at Tempo, obtained rationed foods (11½ lbs. of lard) from William and Carson Armstrong, trading as Armstrong Bros., without a permit from the Ministry of Food; he was further charged with obtaining the lard by false representations. William and Carson Armstrong, trading as Armstrong Bros., were summoned for supplying rationed foods.

William Stewart, an inspector of the Ministry of Food, gave evidence that when he called at Tunney’s shop on 21st March he saw a quantity of lard in the window, which Tunney said he bought from Armstrong Bros. Tunney also told him that he was short of suet, etc., and was giving the lard away with beef to his registered customers. William Armstrong admitted that he sold the lard to Tunney, but on the condition that it would be given back to him. Armstrong said that he understood Tunney had a licence to buy lard, and that he was only obliging him until such time as he (Tunney) got his own supply in. Tunney in a statement said he promised to give the lard back, and that he led them to believe he had a licence to buy. Tunney had a licence to sell but no permit to Acquire. Tunney pleaded that it was “just a bit of a misunderstanding.” Armstrong Bros. representative said that Tunney told him he had a licence to sell the lard and witness said he would lend him this quantity of lard until he got his own supply in. Tunney said he would return it when he got his own supply in. Witness lent the lard to Tunney on that understanding. His Worship said that these regulations must be strictly kept. For obtaining rationed goods by false representations he said that Tunney had caused a lot of trouble, and must pay 40s and 2s costs, this to rule the charge for obtaining rationed goods. “I think,” added his Worship, “that Armstrong Bros, were honestly misled. Therefore, I let them off under the Probation of Offenders Act.”

 

27-6-1942. HELD TO BE DESERTER. BUNDORAN MAN’S CASE. Edward Doherty, stated to be a native of Bundoran, with a. temporary address in Duncairn Gardens, Belfast, appeared an remand before Mr. J. H. Campbell, K.C., R.M., in the City Custody Court on Saturday charged with, being a deserter from the Army. When accused was before the Court last Saturday he alleged he had never been in the Army, that it was a cousin of the same name who had deserted and who had now rejoined the Army and was serving somewhere in the Middle East. The case had been adjourned for defendant to produce his birth certificate. Mr. Walmsley, for the accused, said he had written to Dublin for Doherty’s birth certificate and he had not yet received any reply. District-Inspector Cramsie, produced a number of documents found on the accused. Henry Kerr said at one time he lived at Springtown, County Derry, beside William Doherty, an uncle of defendant, whom accused visited from time to time. He did not believe the accused was ever in the British Army. His Worship held that Doherty was a deserter and ordered him to be handed over to a military escort.

KESH COURT CASES. THREE MONTHS FOR THEFT OF BICYCLE. Kesh Petty Sessions were held on Tuesday, before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M. Patrick McCafferty, Drumshane, Irvinestown, was sentenced to three months’ imprisonment with hard labour for the larceny of a bicycle, value £10, the property of Wm John Mulholland, Derrylougher, Letter.

The R.M. said in the next similar case it would. Be twelve months’ imprisonment. Mr. Jas. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, prosecuted for the Ministry of Agriculture against John McDonagh, Drumcahey, for as alleged, illegally importing two head of cattle. An order for the forfeiture was in respect of one of the animals.

Patrick. J. Monaghan, Drumskinney, was summonsed for acquiring an excess quantity of flour, namely 62 stones, also for harbouring prohibited goods – 10 stones of sugar.

Defendant was fined £2 in each case.

Robert Moore, Mullaghmore, was summonsed for carrying prohibited goods at Movaran, namely 10 fruit loaves, 52 loaves, and 28 currant loaves. A sentence of two months’ imprisonment was ordered. Notice of appeal was given.

Frederick McCrea, Lisnarick, for making a false statement regarding 801bs, of tea, was fined £2, and was given the benefit of the Probation of Offenders Act for failing to furnish particulars of rationed goods. The tea was forfeited.

27-6-1942. FIVE YEARS FOR STEPHEN HAYES. STATEMENT IN COURT. Stephen Hayes, former Chief of Staff of the I.R.A., who gave himself up to the police last September after he had escaped, wounded, from a house in Rathmines, Dublin, where he said he had been held captive after having been “court-martialled,’’ and sentenced to death by members, of an illegal organisation, was last week end sentenced to five years’ penal servitude by the Special Criminal Court, in Dublin, on a charge of having unlawfully usurped and exercised a function of government. He was described as Chief-of-Staff of the I.R.A. He refused to plead and, when asked if he wished to give .evidence on oath or call witnesses, replied that he did not. Later, when the Court—which had entered a plea of not guilty on his behalf—announced that he had been found guilty of the charge, he said he wished to make a statement, and from a slip of paper read the following:— ‘For over twenty-five years I have been associated with the national movement, and in all that time I have done what I considered my duty, conscientiously and according to my lights, fighting as a soldier always. I can swear before God that I have never been guilty of a treacherous or traitorous act against the Irish Republic. Neither have I committed any crime against the Irish people.’

A letter written by Hayes during his nine months’ interment in Mountjoy Prison was produced as the basis of the charge preferred against him.

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